EDU in Review News Blog

Four Remaining All-Men’s Colleges in the United States

Looking for an all-male college?  In the United States, these schools are hard to come by.  Up until the 1950s, single sex colleges and universities were widespread, but that quickly changed as most formerly male schools went coed.  Today, although there about 60 all women’s colleges in the United States, there are only four all male, four year colleges (not counting religious vocational institutions).

So why do young men choose to go to all-male schools?  According to Time Magazine, these schools market themselves as being places with lots of personal attention and camaraderie between males, without the distractions that come with coed institutions.  As you can imagine, many of the students who choose to attend these schools are fairly traditional and conservative, but that’s certainly not true for everyone.

Here’s a little more information about the four remaining all-male, four-year colleges in the United States:

1) Wabash College

Located in the tiny town of Crawfordsville, Indiana, this school of 977 students might not sound like the most exciting place to go to school.  However, Wabash, which has a reputation throughout the Midwest for its rigorous academics, has a very active sports and fraternity scene, and many students are also very involved in the local community.  Wabash is unique in that students have a great deal of behavioral leniency.  There’s only one rule: The Gentleman’s Rule, which states that, “A Wabash man is to conduct himself as a gentleman at all times, both on and off campus.”

2) Hampden-Sydney College

Located in rural central Virginia, this college of about 1,000 is known for outstanding teaching and unabashedly conservative students.  There’s a strict honor code at Hampden-Sydney, and students take this and their academics very seriously. Sports is huge, especially football, and students dress in formal attire on football weekends.

3. Morehouse College

Along with being an all-male college, this Atlanta school of 2,900 students is one of the most prestigious historically black colleges in the United States.  The academic atmosphere is tough, but there’s a strong atmosphere of camaraderie, as everyone wants to help each other succeed.  This dry campus doesn’t offer an overabundance of activities, but since it’s located in Atlanta, students find plenty to do — and Spelman College, an equally prestigious historically black college for women, is in walking distance.

4) St. John’s University

Located in Collegeville, Minnesota, St. John’s is sort of a compromise between co-ed and all male.  This Roman Catholic affiliated college is tightly affiliated with the College of Saint Benedict, an all women’s college in the nearby town of St. Joseph.  Students live on separate campuses, but they take classes together and have access to resources on both campuses.






5 Responses to “Four Remaining All-Men’s Colleges in the United States”

  1. Lawrenceville School Receives a $60 Million Donation | Edu in Review Blog says:

    [...] held weekly coffee breaks for the students and acted as mother-figures in the otherwise entirely male school. These “Ladies of Lawrenceville” played a huge role in the school and the lives of the [...]

  2. Co-Ed Colleges with the Most Males | Edu in Review Blog says:

    [...] unbalanced number of females to males and now we’re flip-flopping. Generally speaking, the colleges with the most males tend to also be heavy military or technical schools, while those that attract more females tend to [...]

  3. Sandra R says:

    Hi! I was surfing and found your blog post… nice! I love your blog. :) Cheers! Sandra. R.

  4. richel says:

    Informative article…thank you..

  5. 4 Great All-Women's Colleges | Edu in Review Blog says:

    [...] there are only four remaining all-men’s colleges in the United States, there are about 60 all-women’s [...]


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