EDU in Review News Blog

How to Transition to College Greek Life after Pledging

greek for meCongratulations! You made it through rush week, bid day, you’ve pledged, and got yourself to be a full-fledged member of a fraternity or sorority on your campus! At GreekForMe.com, this week’s guest blogger for EduInReview.com, we’re champions of all the benefits the Greek system offers, and are more than simply your sorority apparel and fraternity apparel headquarters – we’re your Greek go-tos! We’re Greeks ourselves, and made the transition from regular ol’ college student life to Greek life, too. It’s not always as easy as you’d think, so read on for ways to make your transition as smooth sailing as possible!

Higher Standard of Ethics

Many Greek organizations are esteemed in rich tradition and have been around for decades, if not centuries! They have a specific mission, goals, and most importantly, a code of ethics. You’ll be expected to ensure your behavior falls in line with these ethics, such as contributing positively to the community, participating in philanthropic events, and upholding high academic standards. Of course, your personality and fun spirit should still shine through; just know that your actions now reflect not only on yourself, but on your fraternity or sorority, too!

Juggling Greek and Academic Life

As a typical college student, you focused on your classes and homework, any sports and clubs you’re involved in, a job or internship, and spending time with friends. Now, it’s time to throw your Greek commitments into the mix. You’ll need to attend fraternity and sorority meetings and events each month, and should also assist in event planning committees here and there to show you’re an active member of your Greek organization. It can be tough juggling all of these commitments and responsibilities, so it’s time to get organized! Read how to balance Greek life with college life.coed

Create a Google calendar for yourself or on your cell phone, and schedule time each day for:

  • Sports and clubs commitments to retain your non-Greek interests
  • Homework and studying to keep those grades up
  • Relaxing with both Greek and non-Greek friends
  • Most importantly, schedule “you” time! Whether it’s an hour at the gym, watching TV, or reading, this is a must to keep stress at bay and ensure you enjoy all college and Greek life has to offer!

Commit yourself to stick to this schedule, and we promise you this transition will be much smoother than you think! Plus, it’ll prepare you for being organized in the post-college real world.

Learn What is a Good Handshake

One of the primary benefits of being a Greek is all the wonderful people you’ll meet and greet. Some of them will help you earn your first job a few years from now, others will help you study, and a lucky group will be your friends for life. When introducing yourself to new faces, maintain an open, friendly expression, and extend your hand for a solid handshake. Think handshakes are just for the office? Showing professionalism as a college student will go a long way into establishing yourself as a reliable girl or guy – just the type you want to be friends with and gain internships for!

We’re so glad you’re entering Greek life! Stay open to learning more about the Greek system and getting to know your fellow brothers and sisters, but be sure you retain that great personality of yours. You’re well on your way to some of the most fun years of your life, chock full of memories and lessons learned along the way. In no time, you’ll be giving your own tried and true advice to recently pledged Greeks!






2 Responses to “How to Transition to College Greek Life after Pledging”

  1. Fun Date Party Ideas for the New School Year | Edu in Review Blog says:

    [...] you are new to the Greek Life and haven’t got a clue what a date party is, let me fill you in. Date parties are usually [...]

  2. TBS Premieres Glory Daze Tonight, a New Show About Greek Life | Edu in Review Blog says:

    [...] the series, that also reportedly will highlight the coming of age of the young adolescents as they transition into their new roles as college freshmen. Most of the cast is your typical stereotyped Greek [...]


Leave a Reply