EDU in Review News Blog

ICouldBe Bringing e-Mentors to Your School with Your Help

Young adulthood is full of challenges and difficult decisions. Without the proper support, it’s easy for kids to drop out of high school, get depressed and lead a mediocre existence. From the economy to the crime rates, a poorly-educated population affects everyone. Providing support to teenagers is a critical step in improving our world because, after all, our future is in their hands. One campaign matches virtual mentors with high school and middle school students who need them. The e-mentors on icouldbe.org provide assistance with academics, applying to colleges and finding jobs.

According to icouldbe.org, the guidance counselor to student ratio is 1:5,000 in the United States. We clearly can’t depend on such a small number of professionals to guide our youth when there are so many of us who could also help make a difference.

Are you interested in mentoring but don’t have the time or capabilities of doing it in person? E-mentoring may be perfect for you, and likewise, perfect for your mentee. Icouldbe.org claims that virtual-mentoring provides most of the same benefits as in-person mentoring does. Studies done by scientists at Drexel University have concluded that virtual mentoring greatly improves the college and real-world success of individuals in the program. Included in the program’s benefits are the students’ increased “decision making skills and self-efficacy.”

One of the student participants wrote, “I am 16-years old and will be the first person in my family to attend college. There is no doubt that icouldbe.org changed my life!”

To bring the services of icouldbe.org to a school in your state, $8,000 must first be raised. You can participate here, and also see how each state is performing. You can find icouldbe.org on Twitter or Facebook. You can also visit their website to join them in “mentoring the next generation.”






One Response to “ICouldBe Bringing e-Mentors to Your School with Your Help”

  1. Socioeconomic Standing Impacts Students' Abilities to Ask for Help in Classrooms | Edu in Review Blog says:

    [...] to Jessica McCrory Calarco, the author of the study, the children who are more comfortable asking for assistance might have learned to do so from their parents. These parents “also deliberately coach [...]


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