Jim Lehrer’s Education Background

Jim Lehrer was born on May 19, 1934 to Lois Catherine and Harry Lehrer in Wichita, Kansas. Lehrer is a well-known American journalist and is the news anchor for PBS Newshour. He is sometimes called the “Dean of Moderators” because he has presided over 11 presidential candidate debates, including the most recent debate between President Obama and McCain. EDUinReview will now take a look at the education background of this talented television newscaster.

Lehrer was born in Kansas and spent his early childhood there, but his family moved to Texas before he was in middle school. He attended middle school in Beaumont, Texas and high school in San Antonio, Texas. He graduated from Thomas Jefferson High School, where he was a sports editor for The Jefferson Declaration, the school’s newspaper.

After high school, Lehrer decided to pursue a higher education at Victoria College. He then transferred to the University of Missouri, where he earned a journalism degree.

Upon competition of his higher education, Lehrer decided to join the military. He enlisted in the United States Marines, and credits this experience with showing him parts of the world that he would not have been able to see without serving in the military.

Lehrer returned to Texas after his tour with the Marines was finished. He secured a job as a reporter for the Dallas-Times Herald in 1963; one of his first major assignments was reporting President Kennedy’s assassination. Lehrer was a very busy man at this time in his life; he was also a news anchor for KERA, a PBS affiliate. Since 1975, Lehrer has hosted The Lehrer News Hour for PBS, making it the second longest running news program on television.

Lehrer has received many awards for his work as a newscaster and journalist. These awards include the University of Missouri School of Journalism‘s Medal of Honor, the George Foster Peabody Award, and the National Humanities Medal. He was inducted into the Television Hall of Fame in 1999.

One Response to “Jim Lehrer’s Education Background”

  1. Milan Moravec says:

    Is your university in decline? Curious about what’s happening at University of California Berkeley?The evidence of UC Berkeley’s relative decline are clear: Cal tumbles from 2nd best in the world. In 2004, for example, the London-based Times Higher Education ranked UC Berkeley the second leading research university in the world, just behind Harvard; in 2009 that ranking had tumbled to 39th place.
    When UC Berkeley announced its elimination of baseball, men’s and women’s gymnastics, and women’s lacrosse teams and its defunding of the national-champion men’s rugby team, the chancellor sighed, “Sorry, but this was necessary!”
    But was it? Yes, the university is in dire financial straits. Yet $3 million was somehow found to pay the Bain consulting firm to uncover waste and inefficiencies in UC Berkeley, despite the fact that a prominent East Coast university was doing the same thing without consultants.
    Essentially, the process requires collecting and analyzing information from faculty and staff. Apparently, senior administrators at UC Berkeley believe that the faculty and staff of their world-class university lack the cognitive ability, integrity, and motivation to identify millions in savings. If consultants are necessary, the reason is clear: the chancellor, provost, and president have lost credibility with the people who provided the information to the consultants. Chancellor Robert J Birgeneau has reigned for eight years, during which time the inefficiencies proliferated. Even as Bain’s recommendations are implemented (“They told me to do it”, Birgeneau), credibility and trust problems remain.
    Bain is interviewing faculty, staff, senior management and the academic senate leaders for $150 million in inefficiencies, most of which could have been found internally. One easy-to-identify problem, for example, was wasteful procurement practices such as failing to secure bulk discounts on printers. But Birgeneau apparently has no concept of savings: even in procuring a consulting firm, he failed to receive proposals from other firms.

    Students, staff, faculty, and California legislators are the victims of his incompetence. Now that sports teams are feeling the pinch, perhaps the California Alumni Association, benefactors and donators, and the UC Board of Regents will demand to know why Birgeneau is raking in $500,000 a year despite the abdication of his responsibilities.
    The author, who has 35 years’ consulting experience, has taught at University of California Berkeley, where he was able to observe the culture and the way the senior management operates.

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