Archive for the ‘Technology’ Category

4 Must Have Educational Apps For Special Needs Kids

We have compiled a list of apps for dyslexic learners, apps for autistic learners, apps for the visually impaired and apps for learners with writing difficulties.

We found this visual and thought it would be perfect for teachers to use for students with a special needs student.

apps-for-special-needs-kids

1) Dyslexia Quest

In this app, the strategy is to climb the mountain and play the yeti games. Each game will test memory and learning skills. The Yeti Master will explain signs of dyslexia.

“My 9 year old son loves this app” says one app user.

2) Autism iHelp

Autism iHelp is a vocabulary teaching aid developed by parents of a child with Autism and a speech-language pathologist. Autism iHelp was inspired by the need for specific language intervention tools for children with Autism Spectrum Disorder focusing on their unique strengths and difficulty with expressive vocabulary.

3) Dragon Dictation

Dragon Dictation is an easy-to-use voice recognition application powered by Dragon® NaturallySpeaking® that allows you to easily speak and instantly see your text or email messages. In fact, it’s up to five (5) times faster than typing on the keyboard.

“This app has changed my life.” says one app reviewer.

4) iWrite Words

iWriteWords teaches your child handwriting while playing a fun and entertaining game.

“The Best iPhone Apps for Kids” says the NY Times.

We hope these apps help you with your special needs students or children. If you have any other education apps, please let us know.

Mamma.com

 

 



Minecraft Adds Educational Edition

minecraft educational edition

Microsoft announced on November 1, 2016, that Minecraft educational edition is now available for purchase. It is the learning focused version.

The new educational app allows teachers to change the variables for the world and offer up items to students. They can also communicate with students and transport them virtually from a central interface.

Minecraft: Education Edition is no longer free, but will instead cost $5 per user. Volume pricing will be available for larger institutions.

In addition to the software, Microsoft offers a dedicated website for educators at education.minecraft.net. Teachers can find tutorials, starter plans and message each other.



An Online Master’s Degree For Only $7,000

georgia tech masters program

The online master’s degree business is booming big time. Graduating students are looking for that additional push to get an MBA to try and secure that top spot at a worthwhile company. Top colleges are willing to give you a masters degree – for a hefty price tag.

Georgia Tech is doing things a little bit different, charging only $510 for a three credit class. You can get a master’s in computer science from an accredited, top ranked school like Georgia Tech for about only $7,000. Why would anyone even go to a four-year college anymore? Why would you go to Syracuse and pay over $50k?

The online program at Georgia Tech enrolls about 4,000 students which are mostly Americans, whereas on-campus students average about 300 students or so and are mostly from other countries.

For more information on this emerging program, explore the master’s program at Georgia Tech.



Your Friends’ Moods Online Can Impact Yours in Reality

By this time, I think we’ve all heard the story of the Facebook experiment that caused some people to see mostly positive posts and others to see mostly negative posts. When it was revealed the study took place without the knowledge of any of Facebook’s users, people were outrage and dismissed the study as unethical.

facebook mobile

While I personally agree that the way information was gathered for the study was pretty sketchy, but it did yield some interesting results. The study showed that the more positive posts you see, the more positive things you’re likely to post yourself. The same went for negative posts.

According to the Pew Research Internet Project, 90 percent of people in the 18-29 age bracket use social networking sites. If we take Facebook’s study to be true, that means 90 percent of college-age people’s emotions are somewhat influenced by their virtual social network.

Read the rest of this entry »



The Last Text Documentary Powerfully Shows Impact of Texting and Driving

Statistics from Texting and Driving Safety’s website say that 77% of young adults are confident that they can text safely while driving. Despite this statistic, fatal car accidents have been caused by texting and driving. The world’s most successful phone company, AT&T has released a texting and driving documentary called, “The Last Text.”

“The Last Text” features four people whose lives have been impacted by a simple text message. The names of the individuals featured in the documentary are not mentioned, but if you take ten minutes of your time to watch the documentary you will think twice before texting and driving.

The documentary opens up with a highway patrol officer who talks about his encounters with multiple fatal accidents caused by texting. The officer has to pause for a second during the documentary because he becomes emotional discussing the young lives lost. Read the rest of this entry »



20 Under 20 Documentary Highlights Entrepreneurial Potential of Education Dropouts

The recent documentary on CNBC, 20 Under 20: Transforming Tomorrow program, highlights an exciting shift in technology and education and it’s creating quite a stir. This program started when a visionary from Silicon Valley named Peter Thiel decided to undergo a search for the next generation of entrepreneurs. Mr. Thiel started a fellowship program where he offers the winning fellows $100,000 to drop out of college to pursue cutting edge business and technology opportunities.

The documentary tells the stories of the young men and women who are competing for the coveted prize. The most notable requirement of this program is that in order to become a Thiel Fellow you must walk away from your education to focus on entrepreneurship full time. There’s no secret that many successful entrepreneurs abandoned college to work on their passion full time. People like Michael Dell of Dell Computers, Mary Kay Ash of Mary Kay Cosmetics, Walt Disney, Henry Ford of Ford Motor Company, Steve Jobs and Bill Gates are just a few super successful examples who dropped out of school.

Some major breakthrough ideas are in the forefront and presented by finalists competing to become Thiel Fellows. The winning Thiel Fellows include Connor Zwick, who left Harvard behind to revolutionize America’s education system, Noor Siddiqui, who plans to lift one billion people out of poverty, and Tony Ho and Anand Gupta who think they’ve found a way to help doctors catch cancer before it’s too late. Read the rest of this entry »



It’s Fun to Raise Bilingual Kids with Chungaboo’s Language Learning App

“I want to play Chinese!” is a phrase my two-year-old daughter often shouts out. I’m never sure if she really wants to play with Chungaboo’s iBook “Words: English to Chinese” or if she knows it’s a sure-fire way to gain access to the iPad. Either way, I call it a win. These books are so engaging with vivid illustrations by artist Miles Wisniewski and expert language translation voiceovers that even my toddler is picking up pieces of the Mandarin language and inserting it into every day conversation. Earlier this summer we introduced you to Chungaboo in a feature at Yahoo! Shine, Parents Should Load iPads with Chungaboo eBooks for Summer Learning, and we think no matter the season these books should be in your kids’ hands.

An article about bilingual children at Parents.com said, “The earlier you introduce a second language, the easier it will be for your child to pick up its unique sounds.” It went on to say that ages 2 to 3 are ideal for introducing a second language because it’s at this time that the “ability to hear different phonetic pronunciations is sharpest.”

We all know that children are sponges and are at the peak of learning ability in their earliest ages, so my husband and I loved finding Chungaboo (disclaimer: created by friends we met in college) for our daughter. She thinks it’s a game, we know she’s learning, and according to an article in the New York Times this past spring, each time she plays and picks up a new word she’s getting a little brighter. Read the rest of this entry »



Curiosity in the Classroom Designed to Get Students and Teachers Excited about Science and Math

If you ask a student if he or she were interested in math and science, statistics say they would more than likely give a resounding no over a yes. However, if you ask them if they are curious, they might be more apt to give a positive answer. A new site, CuriosityintheClassroom.com, capitalizes on this spirit of inquiry that children have by providing engaging learning materials for them, their parents, and their teachers.

Curiosity in the Classroom, a venture between Discovery Education and Intel Corporation, encourages students in grades 6-12 to ask questions and find ways to answer them.

Does our brain store all the memories we’ve ever had?

How many texts does an average teen send per month?

Are robots “intelligent”?

The answers may surprise you, and this website answers all of these questions and more.

This interest in scientific findings is more than just a way for kids to pass the time, it may be essential to their later success in finding employment, a career, and the good of the country as a whole. Resources on the website for teachers include troubling research about students’ perceptions of their science, technology, engineering, and mathematics skills, which are fields in which the demand is increasing, the unemployment rates are low, and the pay is great. Read the rest of this entry »



Google Fiber Makes Internet Faster for Students and Residents of Kansas City

After months of anticipation, on July 26 Google announced the launch of its own ultra-fast Internet and TV service, Google Fiber. Google said that the Internet would be one hundred times faster than what most Americans have today, promising a lightning-fast 1 GB access speed. Want to download a movie? Download it in one second, flat. Google Fiber TV lets users instantaneously download, record, and store television programs as well as stream shows online with no wait time.

The service is currently only offered in Kansas City as the company tests its development. Kansas City competed with hundreds of other cities vying for the bid from Google for this distinction. Only neighborhoods where enough people pre-register for the service will be hooked up to Google’s own fiber cables that they have spent months running through the city, bypassing local Internet and cable providers. Google hopes to expand its service to other cities if Kansas City’s service goes well. In its first week of signing up customers, seven thousand households had registered. Read the rest of this entry »



The University of Reddit Offers College-Level Classes for Free

My boyfriend is constantly on Reddit.com, so I finally caved and decided to check out the website that has a cute little alien as its mascot. Like most websites whose content is user-generated, there are a lot of cute pictures of animals, funny videos, and…oh wait, that’s not normal…a free university where you can learn about anything from art to languages to philosophy.

The University of Reddit is a new website that was created from a sub-Reddit. On UReddit, users can create their own courses and teach other users about whatever they want to teach. Some of the classes are introductory type classes (example: Hindi 101), while others are more advanced and specific (example: Vertebrate Palentology – The History of Vertebrate Life).

According to the creators, UReddit is “the product of free intellectualism and is a haven for the sharing of knowledge. Teachers and students are free to explore any subject that interests them. Unlike a convential university, University of Reddit strives to make its course offerings free, varied, and easily accessible. …Students don’t have to worry about attendance, grades, or tuition – this isn’t a regular university.”

Read the rest of this entry »





☺ old