Careers

How to Change Careers after Graduating with the Wrong Degree

Sally studied pre-medicine during her four undergraduate years at a local university. She really enjoyed her classes, especially the zoology and anatomy ones. However, after graduating, Sally interned at a local hospital and discovered that she couldn’t stand the sight of blood. She realized that she did not want to pursue a career in medicine after all, but would rather teach anatomy to high school students. But wait a second, how in the world can she do that when her degree is in pre-medicine?

It’s a more common situation than you might think: What do you do if you graduate college, enter the work force in the field that you have studied, and realize that you picked the wrong field for you? Well, you could suck it up, decide to stay in your chosen field, and forever wonder if there was another field that might have been better for you. Or you can take action and change your future, without having to go back to school for another four years of schooling. Here are some ways you can change your career path without having to go back to school full-time.

1. Look for alternative certification. There are many fields that require a bachelor’s degree. However, many of these same fields also accept alternative certification. For example, in Oklahoma, if you want to become a teacher but do not have a bachelor’s in education, you can take several ACT-style tests, go before a board of educators, and eventually receive a certificate that says you are qualified to teach. Usually, this process is much less time-consuming and less expensive than going back to school for another bachelor’s degree. Read the rest of this entry »



Is Grad School a Waste of Money?

I hear it all the time: “A graduate degree is the new bachelor’s degree.” Meaning, to get ahead in your chosen career path, you not only need four years of schooling, but six. However, recent studies show that even grad school won’t benefit everybody.

“I expected to get out of grad school and find a job fairly easily, even in the down economy,” said Eric Peters, who earned a master’s degree in 2009 from Radford University. “What I found after applying to more than 150 jobs was that experience weighs far more than education. And I’m talking paid full-time experience, because I had four internships under my belt when I graduated that didn’t seem to matter very much.”

Peters, who got his degree in corporate and professional communications, learned after some extensive job-hunting that experience out ways education in the communications field. In the end, he settled for an entry-level position, which are generally reserved for young, inexperienced workers.

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Jobs with the Highest Depression Rates

It doesn’t matter if you’re 10, 21 or 55; it’s hard to decide what career path you want to take. Personally, I have changed my mind at least a dozen times. The only things that consistently keep me happy are my family and my writing. Speaking of being happy with your job, did you know that some careers are more likely to produce depressed workers? Although it’s true, that doesn’t mean I’m discouraging anyone from pursuing these higher-than-normal depression-causing careers. Hundreds of factors can contribute to the cause of depression, so it’s important not to choose your career based off this list. However, it’s some interesting trivia and may prove helpful for those of you who are already susceptible to the blues.

Child Care and Nursing Home Workers Almost 11 percent of the nursing home and child care workforce report having symptoms of depression. This particular field can be very rewarding, but it’s important to remember that the caregivers often do tremendous amounts of work for people that are unable- or in some cases, unwilling- to provide praise and thanks. For many people, the stress of this job piles up over the years.

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Resume Keywords are the Newest Factor in the Job Search Process

I will graduate from college this year. As that deadline looms closer and closer, I have started to realize that I need to find a job. I have been to several interview workshops and had my resume proofread by countless advisers. However, I just learned something that nobody ever bothered to tell me: resumes need keywords.

Most employers prefer resumes that are sent via email. These emailed resumes are then scanned by an Applicant Tracking System (basically, a search engine for resumes). These programs pre-screen your resume to determine if you are a qualified candidate for the position or if the interviewer should look elsewhere for their next employee.

Here a few basic guidelines for properly using resume keywords to get yourself the job interview. Beyond that, it’s up to you to dazzle the interviewer.

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Does School Prestige Matter for Your Major?

EngineeringAccording to an article in today’s Wall Street Journal, the reputation of one’s alma mater plays a more important role in career success for those with pre-professional majors. The journal conducted a survey of people who graduated between 1999 and 2010, asking them: “How important was your undergraduate school’s reputation and connections to your current job/career success?”

Engineering, international business and accounting majors most frequently responded “important” or “very important.” On the other end of the spectrum, history, psychology and communications majors felt that the reputation of their undergraduate school was a less important factor in career success.

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Donald Trump is a Big Believer in Education

One of the most coveted jobs in the world is the one that reports to Donald Trump. Many a college student makes that their post-grad goal, and it’s a lofty one to have. For 16 individuals, a new job with The Trump Organization is closer than ever, as they compete on the incredibly popular “The Apprentice” for its new season, which premieres in a 2-hour episode September 16.donald trump

This will be the first time since 2007 the show follows its original non-celebrity format. And as a reflection of how our society has changed in the past three years, this new season of Apprentice includes a cast that has been hit hardest by the economic downturn. They are qualified professionals who lost their jobs, and recent college grads looking to find their place in this big, bad business world.

“The energy and almost survival of some of these people is unbelievable,” says Trump of the new cast, remarking on their sad and inspiring stories. Read the rest of this entry »



How to Make it Big in Hollywood

HollywoodThe fame and popularity that come along with being a Hollywood star is something many people long for. Many people’s lifelong dream is to be a famous actor or actress. Although being rich and famous has its obvious perks, many people don’t consider the total lack of privacy that famous people must endure.

But, if that type of attention doesn’t bother you, then being a famous actor could be right up our alley. A lot of people have the natural ability to act while others have been professionally trained, but in any case, if you want to become an actor, it’s not a bad idea to take some acting courses to get a feel for it. Read the rest of this entry »



Graduates Beware: Worst Places to Live in the U.S.

Cleveland

Cleveland

As a newly minted graduate, I frequently get asked why I chose to move all the way from Michigan to New York. The simple answer is there are more writing jobs to be found in New York. For many recent college grads there’s one issue that determines where they live or move: jobs.

I was actually surprisingly pleased to see that the Motor City didn’t come up as first on this list of worst places to live in U.S. from Wallet Pop. The major factors considered include the number of foreclosures, health and fitness of the population, crime rate and unemployment.

Here’s how the nation’s cities ranked:

10. Memphis, Tennessee

Not only does Memphis have a crime rate that’s 90% higher than any other community in Tennessee, it also suffers from corruption among city officials. Not long ago, a city administrator used government funds to purchase big screen TVs.

9. Miami, Florida

Florida may be the sunshine state, but things are not looking so bright in Miami. According to Children’s Health, it’s the second worst city to raise a family. It’s had nearly 40,000 foreclosures and also has a considerable problem with violent crime.

8. Newark, New Jersey

First of all, New Jersey has the most Superfund sites of any other state in the union, meaning its residents are exposed to high levels of environmental pollution. More than a quarter of the population lives below the poverty line, and the city is making drastic cuts to public services in an attempt to close a $70 million budget deficit.

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How to Nail a Job Interview

handshakeIn today’s job climate, it can take applying to over 50 or more jobs before you land one interview. With such a drastic shortage of jobs, it’s very important to make the most of each and every interview opportunity you might receive.

There are so many people out of work that an interview is really your only chance to stand out, make a great first impression, and highlight your skills. Below are some tips to do just that, and hopefully land your dream job.

Know your resume: Make sure your resume is tailored to match the job description you’re applying for and you know it inside and out. The interviewer will likely ask you questions based directly on what your resume says, so it would be in your best interest to be ready to discuss anything on it.

Be honest: Answer every question honestly. If you’re unsure of an answer or don’t have direct experience in an area the interviewer is asking about, say so. If you are unsure about a question, make a point to mention that you are willing to learn or be trained in that particular area. It will go over much better than lying and being found out later in the interview. Read the rest of this entry »



The Best Mathematics Schools in the U.S.

student in classCollege degrees are important and picking a major that you enjoy studying will help ensure you enjoy the career that hopefully results from that degree. For those who enjoy math, a bachelor’s degree in mathematics is a great, yet often overlooked, major. Math degrees can set the stage for a number of careers including an actuary, an applied mathematician, a pure mathematician, a statistician or a school math teacher. Those who have a way with numbers, work well independently and love problem solving could find a very fulfilling career in any one of these positions.

Despite the pictures you probably have in your head right now, a math degree doesn’t automatically limit you to solving math equations with paper and a pencil. Math degrees are useful in computer and information systems, health, the business industry or even operations research. The use of data and numbers makes it possible to apply your mathematics degree to many different career options. Like any degree, students that graduate from the best schools will find that they have an edge in their specific job market. Read the rest of this entry »