Sports

Final Four: Shockers and Injury Highlight Last Week of March Madness

As the old saying goes, March Madness brings April Sadness. The tournament field is down to four teams, and if the first two weeks of the tournament served as any indication, the last three games have all the makings of a classic finish in Atlanta. In fact, only nine people out of 3 million participants in the Yahoo bracket challenge picked the Final Four teams correctly.

Florida Gulf Coast’s Cinderella run ended with a whimper against big brother Florida, Michigan staged an unbelievable comeback against Kansas in the only overtime game thus far, and nine seed Wichita State is in their first Final Four since 1964. Jim Boeheim and Syracuse’s oft-shaky squad have used a seamless 2-3 zone defense to get to Atlanta, while Louisville hasn’t let off the gas since their opening round throttling of North Carolina A&T.

The two games on Sunday afternoon weren’t even close, and the most shocking aspect of the day was Louisville’s Kevin Ware breaking his leg after contesting a shot from Duke’s Tyler Thornton. When Ware landed, his right shin snapped in half, exposing a considerable among of bone and leaving the entire arena shuddering. ABC News’ Liz Neporent explained the injury. Louisville players fell to their knees and wept on the court, and gathered around Ware as he was wheeled off on a stretcher. He told them to go win the game, and they abided. With the score knotted at 42, Louisville used a stellar 17-2 run to ice the game. Louisville’s stellar guard play, size and athleticism in the paint, and emotional crusade to win for their fallen teammate, the Cardinals are the favorite to win it all. Read the rest of this entry »



High School Chant Gets Blown Out of Proportion

Since when does a group of high school students chanting “USA! USA!” during a school sporting event earn national media coverage? The answer seems to be “since now.”

During a recent high school basketball state playoff game in San Antonio, TX, a group of high school students who attend Alamo Heights High School began chanting the symbolic letters after their school’s team beat their rival, Edison High.

The seemingly-innocent chant has gained a lot of attention from news sources such as MSNBC, USA Today, and The Huffington Post, because it supposedly intersects race, sports, and politics. You see, the students at Alamo Heights are mostly white, but the students who attend Edison High are mostly Hispanic. Does it make a little more sense now?

When the students started chanting, Andrew Brewer, the head coach of the basketball team, quickly silenced them; the chanting only lasted about five seconds. The school superintendent, Kevin Brown, apologized for the students’ behavior and said that they would not be allowed to attend the state semifinal games as a punishment. However, these actions were not enough to please Gil Garza. Garza made a complaint to the governing body of Texas public schools three days after the event.

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Elementary Students Need Physical Education, Even if the School’s Budget Doesn’t Cover It

elementary school gym classJessica Mazeau teaches physical education at Clifford School in Redwood City, California, five days a week. Her students are in kindergarten through fifth grade and a typical class includes activities such as keep-away with basketballs, hula hooping, and jumping rope. However, Mazeau does not work for the school or for the school district, nor is she a volunteer. Instead, she works for a private company, Rhythm and Moves, which was hired by the school’s parent-teacher organization, to provide physical education and activities for the students after the school’s budget cuts required it to eliminate its programs for students in all grades, except sixth through eighth.

“Clearly, if we don’t fund it the kids are not getting any active outside, except for minimum recess time and lunch time,” said Marilyn Ezrin, co-president of the Clifford School Parent-Teacher Organization.

Along with music education, physical education is becoming a luxury that schools simply cannot afford due to budget cuts and a hurting economy. However, with state requirements in California mandating that students receive 200 minutes of PE classes every 10 days, the responsibility to fulfill this requirement has fallen on classroom teachers.

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Indianapolis College Students Are Upset About Losing Parking Spaces During the Super Bowl

2012 Superbowl LogoMany college students would gladly welcome a few days off from classes in order to attend the Super Bowl; however, for students at Indiana University Purdue University – Indianapolis, this is what is happening, but they are not happy about it. The school recently announced that it will be selling 4,000 parking spots on its campus on the days surrounding the Super Bowl and that they will also be canceling some classes so that students and staff members can enjoy the festivities.

“I think the Super Bowl is great for the city,” said Chris Gault, a student at IUPUI. “I just think that it shouldn’t hinder our education. It seems the school is putting the outsiders and the Super Bowl attendees before the students and their educations.”

For some students, another major offense in this issue is that they will lose their parking spots for a few days. Parking at IUPUI is notoriously difficult, so I can understand why the students would be upset about losing ¼ of their 16,000 spaces.

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College Football Player Makes It Big with Only One Hand

Univsersity of Albany LogoFive years ago, Eddie Delaney was a freshman at the University of Albany. Like many young men, Delaney had played football in high school and wanted to continue playing the sport now that he was in college. So, Delaney and his father made an appointment with the university’s football coach, Bob Ford. Although Delaney had been a team captain in high school, Ford had some reservations about him.

“We were concerned about his hand,” Ford said. “I guess probably 70 percent of the coaches in the nation might have said, ‘No, you can’t do it.'”

Wait, why would a football coach be concerned with a player’s hand? Oh, I guess I forgot to mention one important fact: Delaney was born with only one hand.

Luckily, Ford did allow Delany to join the scout team as a walk-on defensive end player and Delaney practiced against the first-string offensive line. The Great Danes went undefeated in conference games that year. During this time, Delaney gave everything he had to the game.

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High School Students are Maced by Police for Celebrating a Football Victory

Mace Pepper SprayIt sounds like something out of Footloose, but unfortunately, this did not happen in a movie. Last week, police in a small town in Utah used pepper spray on high school students when the students began dancing a Haka celebration dance following a football game victory.

According to the Associated Press, a group of students and young adults who were related to a football player at Roosevelt Union High School started celebrating the team’s win by performing a traditional Maori dance. Evidently, the dancing occurred in a location that blocked the exit and prevented other people from leaving the field. Police asked the celebrators to move so that players and other fans could leave the field. However, they refused, so the police began using pepper spray in order to displace the crowd.

“I’ve never seen anything like it,” said Jason Kelly, a fan of the Roosevelt Union High football team. “It was totally unprovoked.”

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College Students Hold First Midwest Quidditch Cup

2011 Midwest Quddich CupWho says you have to be a British teenage wizard to enjoy a good Quidditch game? Last weekend, 300 college students from the Midwest USA proved that these traits are not at all a requirement to participate in a Quidditch cup. The students were from various universities, including Purdue, Ball State, University of Michigan, and Ohio State University.

“I was going to be in club soccer, but when I heard about Quidditch, I wanted to try it,” said Michael Koester, a freshman at Ball State University. “The great thing about this you don’t have to be a great athlete. I’ve made so many friends, and we have lots of fun together.”

It seems that Koester isn’t the only one who now prefers Quidditch, a fantasy game with players who ride on broomsticks, to other sports.

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Texas A&M Aggies Are Considering Joining the SEC

Although it hasn’t been confirmed, rumor has it that Texas A&M will be joining the SEC. An official announcement will probably be made around August 22.

So when would the Aggies make the move? Some say that it could be as early as 2012. The official deadline for changing football conferences was July 1, 2011, which means that the deadline has already passed for the team to change, but it is still possible for the SEC and Big 12 to settle the issue, probably if Texas A&M pays a larger exit fee.

Part of the reason that the Aggies might be switching conferences can be traced back to the Longhorn Network, a new television network that only airs University of Texas sporting events. Evidently this really upset the Aggies, which could have spurred their decision to change conferences.

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Kimi Raikkonen’s Education Background

Race car driver Kimi-Matias RäikkönenKimi-Matias Räikkönen was born on October 17, 1979 in Espoo, Finland. The Finnish race car driver began his career very young. In kart racing, Räikkönen started having success at the early age of ten. He began racing outside of Finland when he was only 15.

Räikkönen brought in many championships and titles during his young kart racing career. In 1998 he was 1st in the Nordic Championships and in 1999 he placed second in the European Formula Super A Championship. By the age of twenty, Räikkönen had won the British Formula Renault winter series. In 2000, Räikkönen won seven out of ten events in the Formal Renault UK Championship.

Räikkönen began with a Formula One team in September 2000. Räikkönen spent nine seasons racing in Formula One. In 2007 he took the Formula One World Driver’s Championship.
Currently Räikkönen competes in the World Rally Championships for the ICE 1 Racing team.

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Roger Federer’s Education Background

Roger Federer playing tennisRoger Federer was born August 8, 1981 in Binningen, near Basel, Switzerland. He is the son of Swiss national, Robert Federer, and South African-born, Lynette Federer. Federer has both Swiss and South African citizenships.

Like all Swiss citizens, Federer was required to military service in the Swiss Armed Forces. In 2003, Federer was deemed unfit to serve due to a long-standing back problem. Therefore, he was not required to fulfill his obligations.

Federer has been a career tennis player since he was a child. As a junior player, his greatest accomplishments were his single and doubles win at Wimbledon.

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