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Obama Highlights Education in Nomination Acceptance Speech

During his speech at the 2012 Democratic National Convention, President Barack Obama accepted his party’s nomination to run for president and hopefully take on another four years. Among the topics he covered were weighty issues like the economy, the national debt, battling environmental pollution, medicare, and taxes. He also gave his views and ideas on education and how it should be strengthened.

Obama was optimistic about the state of education in America, saying that some of the country’s worst schools have improved their math and reading scores, and that nearly every state has committed to raising their teaching and learning standards. He spoke to concerns about college tuition, bringing up more than once his commitment to keeping rates low.

“Education was the gateway to opportunity for me. It was the gateway for Michelle. And now more than ever, it is the gateway to a middle-class life,” Obama said in his speech.

The president gave several specific goals for raising the bar with education. For college students, he asked his fellow Democrats’ help in putting two million students into community colleges that will guarantee them a job once they leave. He also wants to cut the growth of the cost of tuition at colleges and universities in half over the next decade. (more…)




Public Schools Receive an “F” Among Parents and Community

An August Gallup poll reveals that more than half of Americans are dissatisfied with the public education system, with only 7 percent of parents of school-aged children believing that public schools provide an excellent education. Home schooling rated higher by the general public than public schools for quality, but private schools received the overall best ratings.

The poll reported that 78 percent of Americans said children in private schools received an excellent or good education. Parochial schools came next with a 69 percent rating, then came charter schools (60 percent), home schooling (46 percent) and public schools (37 percent).

Although 83 percent of parents polled said their oldest child attends public school, only 47 percent thought their child was receiving an excellent or good education. Among parents of K-12 students, the results were similar to the public at large, but they gave public schools a slightly higher rating than home schooling. (more…)




Lack of Education Apparent in Unemployment Rates

A new study has been released showing that high jobless rates in major cities across the country may correspond to poor education. Another factor revealed showed that cities hit hard by the housing crisis have larger gaps between workers’ actual education and the required education level of most job listings.

The study was conducted by the Brookings Institution in Washington, D.C. Calculations were completed by senior research associate Jonathan Rothwell, and included online jobs posted between 2006 and 2012.

Rothwell looked at the average number of years required for jobs in 100 metro areas and compared that with the education level of those respective populations. The most narrow education gaps were found in locations with highly-skilled workers such as Raleigh, North Carolina, and Washington, D.C. – both boasting gaps of 2 percent or less.

“Narrowing the education gap is particularly important for improving the long-term health of metropolitan economies,” Rothwell told Forbes in a recent interview. “Metro areas with wide education gaps have higher unemployment, but metro areas with narrow education gaps have lower unemployment, more job creation and more job openings.” (more…)




Employment Rates and Average Salaries Down for New College Grads

A trend that many have suspected to be on the rise – including college graduates – has been confirmed in a recent survey regarding employment rates among young people. An online survey from PayScale.com conducted between July 2011 and July 2012, showed that 63 percent of young people between the ages of 18 and 29 have a bachelor’s degree, however, are often forced to take jobs that don’t require one.

The survey included input from nearly 500,000 young workers, and only further suggested that a four-year college degree doesn’t mean as much as it used to when it comes to securing a job.

As reported by MarketWatch, a similar survey conducted by Rutgers University saw similar conclusions. They found that nearly half of young people who have graduated in the last five years say their jobs don’t require a four-year degree, and only 20 percent said their first job was actually in their desired career field.

Cliff Zukin, a professor of political science and public policy at Rutgers, told MarketWatch that these findings paint a grim picture of employment for recent college grads, saying, “Our society’s most talented people are unable to find a job that gives them a decent income.” (more…)




The New College Student Drug of Choice is Adderall

College life may be a fun and exciting adventure to look forward to, but it’s far from the easiest stage in life. The average college student must learn strong multitasking and time management skills in order to keep up with tests, assigned readings, papers and projects all while working a part-time job in order to pay for bills, gas and groceries.

There are many techniques a college student can employ in order to handle today’s fast-past lifestyle; for example, study groups can be extremely beneficial for cutting down on work load. But there’s another aid students are getting their hands on, and it’s called the “The College Study Drug,” also known as Adderall.  The following is an infographic from LearnStuff.com with statistics concerning the drug.

Adderall is a prescription drug used to treat those who have been diagnosed with ADHD. It helps those who have issues with concentrating to tune into the task at hand.

So what’s the problem? The prescription drug is being abused by millions of college students across campuses all over the country. It’s been found that Adderall can be as addictive as cocaine and meth, and not all of those taking the drug actually have a prescription for it.

Another major issue is the drinking problem for those taking the drug. Nine out of 10 students who are illegally consuming Adderall are also binge drinking. In addition, it’s been found that abusive Adderall takers are more likely to to abuse other drugs as well.

Below is a list of statistics regarding the abuse of “The College Study Drug.”

  • Since 2007, prescriptions for ADHD have risen 26%
  • 8% of American children have ADHD
  • 7 million students are abusing their ADHD treatments
  • Emergency calls about students misusing ADHD drugs are up 76% since 2011
  • 12% of high school seniors, 40% of college students, and 50% juniors and seniors have used a prescription stimulant

By sharing alarming findings such as these, we can inform college students about the dangers of Adderall and other addictive drugs. In doing so, hopefully they will stray far from their path and toward healthy habits instead.

Also Read:

More Than 100 College Professors Sign Letter to Legalize Marijuana

How to Stay Healthy in College

How to Manage You Time in College

*Photo from learnstuff




More Than 100 College Professors Sign Letter to Legalize Marijuana

More than 100 college professors signed their names on a letter advocating the legalization of marijuana. The letter was released yesterday by the campaign Regulate Marijuana Like Alcohol.

The letter was signed by professors from all over the nation, including several from the state of Colorado, as reported by Matt Ferner of The Huffington Post.

The release of the letter coincided with President Obama’s campaign stop at Colorado State University yesterday, during which he aimed to discuss issues that affect college-age voters, such as college tuition.

However, the supporters present were hoping to rally some discussion about Amendment 64 instead – the amendment that’s seeking to legalize and regulate marijuana for adults, jut like alcohol.

Colorado isn’t alone in its push for legalization. Washington and Oregon have marijuana legalization initiatives on their November ballots as well.

So, why are so many college educators from across the nation in support of these initiatives and nationwide legalization? The professors range from law, health, economics, and criminal justice fields, and all seem to have strong feelings on the subject. (more…)




Karen Klein Starts Anti-Bullying Foundation to Spread a Message of Kindness

Karen Klein is a 69-year-old former bus monitor who struck mini-fame after a video of a pack of middle school boys lobbing insults at her on a bus went viral last June.

Like many who viewed the video and felt anger toward the bullies and extreme sympathy for Karen, Reddit user Max Sidorov couldn’t watch the horrific event and stand idly by. So, out of the goodness of his heart he started a campaign on the website indiegogo to raise money so Karen could take a vacation.

The initial goal was to raise $5,000, but within days of the campaign’s commencement the effort had brought in nearly $400,000. Needless to say, the goal quickly went from “send Karen on vacation” to “help Karen retire.”

To date, the campaign has raised $703,873, which Karen says has changed her life forever and not only enabled her to go on vacation, but also retire and take care of her family.

Despite the public attention and large sums of money shuffled in Karen’s direction, she hasn’t let the newfound fame go to her head, nor has she felt compelled to “sit” on the money and coast the rest of her life. Instead, she’s using her new “status” as a platform for good. (more…)




$1.5 Billion Piled on Wall Street Tells Obama and Romney Not to Forget Education

Earlier this summer, 857 desks were placed on the National Mall in Washington D.C. They represent the number of students who drop out of school every hour of every school day each year.

Now, a 6-foot-tall stack of $1.5 billion fake hundred dollar bills sits on a sidewalk near the New York Stock Exchange on Wall Street, representing how much money the economy would gain if the dropout rate of students were reduced by 1 percent.

Both installations are part of an initiative by the College Board to get people talking about education during the presidential campaign. Dubbed “Don’t Forget Ed,” they want to raise awareness on what their website calls a crisis in America.

“It’s my future that they’re messing with. This election is going to make a really big difference to me…If it’s not about education, then it’s not about me,” said Merone, a student featured in one of the campaign’s videos.

Don’t Forget Ed encourages Americans to get involved through social media sites, signing a petition, and talking to others about the issue. In a presidential campaign focused on tough subjects like the economy, health care, and the budget deficit, the College Board doesn’t want education to be left behind in the debate. (more…)




First Scholarship for Illegal Immigrants Granted at a Massachusetts College

In Amherst, Massachusetts, Hampshire College has begun a scholarship fund earmarked for a select group of college hopefuls: illegal immigrants. The scholarship plans to give $25,000 to one student each year who lives in the U.S. but does not hold U.S. citizenship so that he or she can earn a degree. The first recipient received the scholarship for 2012-2013 school year.

The fund has $300,000 so far that was donated by alumni, students, parents, and other donors at Hampshire College. Currently, undocumented immigrants in Massachusetts must pay out-of-state tuition to attend college, with Hampshire charging $43,000 in yearly tuition. The federal government does not give any financial aid to illegal immigrants.

A handful of other colleges and universities also offer scholarships specifically for illegal immigrants, but this is the first in Massachusetts. States vary on their handling of the issue of whether to let illegal immigrants attend college and if they should receive discount rates. Most states treat them as international students and charge out-of-state tuition rates, with thirteen offering in-state tuition. Three states allow illegal immigrants to receive state financial aid, but three others – Georgia, Colorado, and South Carolina – ban them from attending state colleges and universities. (more…)




Brian Tracy Found his Maximum Potential Despite Being a High School Dropout

To Brian Tracy, luck is foreseeable. Those with good luck have a reason for it. “If you want more luck, take more chances. Be more active. Show up more often,” he says.

Brian Tracy was born in Canada in 1944. His early life was humble and he did not seem to have the makings for success, as he was born to a poor family and dropped out of high school. He worked as a laborer, then got a job on a tramp steamer and traveled around the world, visiting and living in many diverse countries. He eventually became a salesman, which started him on his path to success and helping others achieve success.

Tracy did not begin as a great salesperson, but worked hard and copied other good salesmen and read about their techniques. Soon he was the top salesperson in his company, and in two years went into management as vice president of the company. He eventually became the CEO of a $265 million development company.

Starting as a salesperson, Tracy later became involved in real estate, advertising, the auto industry, investments, training and consulting. He went back to school and got his MBA from the University of Alberta. He then developed his first training program that would become the book Maximum Potential (1995). (more…)




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