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Did Beto O’Rourke even go to College?

Beto Rouke

Beto O’Rourke is an American politician and businessman. He served on the El Paso City Council from 2005-2011 and was elected to the United States House of Representatives in 2012. He is the Democratic Party nominee in the 2018 Texas U.S. Senate running against Republican incumbent Ted Cruz.

O’Rourke is known for being a progressive or liberal Democrat. His political plans include combatting global warming, increasing federal aid to schools. He supports the decriminalization of cannabis, favors immigration reform and champions Planned Parenthood and marriage equality.

Personal Life:

Born in El Paso, TX on Sept. 26, 1972, Francis ‘Beto’ O’Rourke is the son of Melissa Martha Williams and El Paso County Judge Pat Francis O’Rourke. His father was a political associate of former Texas Governor Mark White.

After graduating college, O-Rourke worked for an internet service provider in New York City and then co-founded Stanton Street Technology, an internet software company that develops websites and software. He also played bass in a band called Foss which featured members who went on to have impressive music careers.

O’Rourke married his wife, Amy Sanders in 2005. The two have three young children together, Ulysses, Molly and Henry. He enjoys staying in shape and often shares his workout routine with his Facebook followers.

Beto Rouke College

Education:

O’Rourke attended Carlos Rivera and Mesita Elementary Schools and El Paso High School. He then moved on to graduate from the Woodberry Forest School in 1991. This is a private, all male boarding school located in Woodberry Forest Madison County, VA. Current enrollment is 395.

He then moved on to attend Columbia University in New York City where he was captain of the rowing crew. He graduated in 1995 with a Bachelor of the Arts degree in English literature. Established in 1754, Columbia is a private Ivy League research university. It contains the oldest college in New York State and is the fifth chartered institution of higher learning in the U.S. making it one of nine colonial colleges founded prior to the Declaration of Independence.

 



Yale and Columbia Reinstate the Navy R.O.T.C. Program

For decades, there has not been any type of military presence on Yale University‘s campus. R.O.T.C programs across the country were kicked off college campuses during the Vietnam War, when students protested against the war. However, more recently, these programs have been kept off campuses at many schools due, in a large part, to the military’s “don’t ask, don’t tell” policy regarding homosexuality, which many students disapproved of. This policy was recently overturned, and now, Yale officials have signed an agreement with the Navy to reinstate a R.O.T.C program at the school, starting in the Fall 2012 semester.

The idea to reinstate a R.O.T.C program began last fall, when a student survey found that a majority of Yale students were in favor of renewing the relationship between the Navy R.O.T.C program and the school. A vote by Yale’s faculty in early May sealed the deal, allowing R.O.T.C to become a part of campus life again.

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Christopher Reeve Education Background

christopher-reeveChristopher Reeve was born on the September 25, 1952 to Franklin and Barbara Reeve in New York City. After his parents divorced when he was four, his mother moved Christopher and his brother to Princeton, New Jersey.

Reeve was a student at Nassau Street School for a time and later moved to Princeton Country Day School where he excelled as a student academically and athletically.

Reeve landed his first acting job when he was just nine years old. He  wanted to head to New York City and start his acting career immediately but his mother made him apply to numerous colleges such as Carnegie Mellon, Columbia, Princeton and even Harvard. Reeve decided to attend Cornell, because it was the closest to New York.

Later he enrolled at Julliard, the prestigious school for the arts. After his first year at Julliard, he graduated from Cornell and his acting career took off. The role that made him a household name was  Clark Kent in the Superman series. Read the rest of this entry »



Top Five Public Universities for Ivy League Alternatives

ivy-leagueJust like Blair on Gossip Girl has dreamed of going to Yale since childhood, many students simply won’t be happy unless they are accepted to an Ivy League school. Some are driven since birth to maintain a perfect educational reputation, and some will do whatever it takes to attend the school of their dreams. In the end, is it worth the extreme hard work and dedication? After all, what’s in a name, as long as you get a top education and don’t owe more than what your parent’s house is worth when it is all said and done.

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Journalism School Enrollment is Booming

I don’t know about you, but I was actually kind of surprised to read this. Forbes announced this week that enrollment in journalism schools is up, a surprising statistic when most everything in this economy is down, including newspapers. I was especially caught by this news when just a week ago CBS Sunday Morning ran a story called “Stop the Presses,” in which they talked about how crippled the newspaper business has become. The story lamented the end of an era for print journalism, citing bankruptcies, layoffs and even closed doors for many large and small newspapers. Print circulations are down, as is ad spending in newspapers.newspaper

So it makes sense that the degree program to land you one of these jobs is filling classroom seats… right? Newspaper journalism might be mourning its twilight, but journalism is most certainly not dead. While the Internet can be primarily blamed for the downward turn for print, it can also be heralded for creating an almost romantic resurgence in journalism. Computers and Web publishing don’t come with that hardened, musty newsroom feel, but it does open more doors, allow for more creative approaches to reporting, and reach more of the people we want to have hear our stories anyway.

According to the Forbes report, enrollment in journalism programs at Columbia are up 38%, 20% at Stanford and 6% at NYU. Even state schools are enjoying the surge, with an increased enrollment of 25% at the University of Maryland. They aren’t doing it for the love of the money, just the game, according to Nicholas Lemann, dean of the Columbia School of Journalism. “I’ve never met a single person in 35 years who went into journalism out of pure economic reason,” Lemann says. Read the rest of this entry »



Anti-Intellectualism, the Ivy League, and Obama’s Cabinet

During a summer job when I was in college, I was chatting with a fellow college student.  I asked her where she went to school.

“At a school in Connecticut,” she said.

“Where at?” I asked.

“New Haven,” she said, sort of blushing.

“Oh, you go to Yale!” I said, “How cool is that?”

I wonder how many other Ivy League students out there answer the question “where do you go to school?” with such an evasive response.  Perhaps she thought that others would think she was a snob, or that they would think that she was bragging, if she answered the question directly.  I, for one, certainly didn’t think less of her, quite the opposite.

But isn’t this a shame?  On the one hand, Americans admire Ivy League educations, and because of this, the names on their transcripts can open some doors.  On the other hand, there’s a powerful undercurrent of distrust of intellectualism in America.  Whether it’s high school students mocking the smart kids, or college girls playing down their intelligence in class, or Fox News accusing Barack Obama of being an “elite” because he went to Columbia and Harvard, people are a little distrustful of those who have brains, an education, and the desire to work hard in their studies.  Read the rest of this entry »





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