dorm roommate

dorm roommate

Back-to-School Dorm Checklist

Packing for the dorms and not sure where to start? Remember that you don’t need to bring everything from home, but you will need most of it. After all, the dorm will be your “home” for the next four years.

Start out by making a check list of essential items and create sections within that list. Divide your list into: clothing, electronics, bedding, room furnishings, toiletries, cookware and laundry essentials. This way you won’t forget anything, and spend your hard earned money on duplicate housewares. Save that money for partying and food- you’re going to need it.

Read below to find additional tips when packing for the dorms:

Items to leave at home: These items are already furnished in the dorms.

-vacuum
– mirror
-desk and chair
-dresser
-twin bed
-ironing board

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How to Tell Your Roommate He Smells

how-to-tell-your-rommmate-she-smellsHow do you tell your roommate that he or she needs to shower more, without hurting their feelings or creating a conflict? Dr. Fayr Barkley has some good advice.

There are several things to consider before you approach your roommate with a bar of soap. Take into account the closeness of your relationship, cultural differences and emotional sensitivity. “Think in terms of how you would like to hear it from someone,” Dr. Barkley writes for hercampus.com. “The words you would want to hear, the sincerity of the person, the benefits you would want to know about having good hygiene and some points on how to go about making the change.”

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20 Ways to Annoy Your College Roommate

Living in a small dorm room with a total stranger is a universally stressful experience.  Learning to be polite and considerate to each other is a must, as is mature, open communication about what the two of you expect from each other. But if you really want to get on your roommate’s nerves, here are 20 great strategies.

dorm

  1. Use your snooze button whenever possible.
  2. Avoid cleaning, especially things involving food and dirty underwear.
  3. Have an extra loud ring tone, and make sure it goes off in the middle of the night.
  4. Have an extra loud everything, for that matter. The noisier you are, the better.
  5. Make sure you have lots of company whenever your roommate has an exam.
  6. Buy a comforter that completely clashes with your roommate’s.
  7. Borrow your roommate’s things–no biggie, right?
  8. Break your roommate’s things–no biggie, right?
  9. Gossip about your roommate to everyone on the floor.
  10. Forget to mention that visitors have stopped by.
  11. Spill perfume or cologne in the room.
  12. Study in the room all the time.
  13. Eat your roommate’s food, and drink his or her milk right out of the carton.
  14. Make sure your guests are rude to your roommate.
  15. If you have a “special” guest, be sure to be be intimate in front of your roommate.
  16. Eat things in the room that gross your roommate out.
  17. Spill things on your roommate’s homework
  18. Be rude when your roommate’s parents visit (bonus points for being drunk).
  19. Put political and religious messages all over your side of the room that your roommate disagrees with.
  20. Flirt with your roommate’s ex–or current.


Getting to Know Your Freshman Year Roommate Over the Summer

Incoming students, your first year of college is just months away! And like many freshmen, you may be about to experience the most frustrating part of adjusting to school: living with a total stranger in a tiny dorm room. However, with a good attitude, life with a roommate doesn’t need to be painful. And the first thing you can do is establish a good relationship with your roommate over the summer before school starts.

As soon as you get information about your new roommate, make contact. Back in the “old days” when I went to college (1988), that meant a phone call. Of course, today there’s email. And if you’re both on Facebook or MySpace, add each other for sure. Getting to know each other a little bit now will make the transition easier, and you can use cyberspace to do this easily.

When meeting your roommate, keep an open mind. When I first called my roommate, I felt like she was looking for things not to like about me. Don’t do this. You certainly don’t have to be best friends with your roommate, or even friends at all—but you will have a much easier time if the two of you are friendly to and respectful of each other. So assume the best about your roommate, especially at first.

Once you get to know each other a little, summer is a good time to talk about expectations you have about the room, or even to draw up a roommate contract. Compromise is important, but it’s also important that you let each other know what you expect. For example, if one of you isn’t cool with overnight visits from the opposite sex, get that out in the open now before it becomes a problem. If cleanliness is very important to you, let that be known.

On a more practical note, summer is a good time to discuss things you’re going to bring to the room. One of you might choose to bring the fridge, and other the rug. You can also discuss color schemes to make sure things don’t horribly clash.

If you can, meet your roommate in person. This will make the first day in the dorm a whole lot less weird. If you live close to one another, get together for coffee or lunch. If you’re a long drive away from each other, consider getting together for lunch on campus, or invite your roommate over to your home.

Spend some time getting to know your roommate over the summer. Remember, freshman year is stressful, and the time you take to establish a comfortable relationship with your roommate can make things much easier.





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