grammar

grammar

A Student’s Guide to Email Etiquette

blue envelope symbolYou may know what to say, but do you know how to say it?  That’s often the mishap that college students and grads have when they’re emailing someone they want to impress.

If you’re anxious about emailing your professor or potential employer, don’t fret. Read these tips to impress and earn the respect of the recipient.

Your emails must be formal if you want to leave a good impression. Save smiley faces and phrases like “LOL” for your BFF. Contractions and abbreviations are OK for the most part, but texting lingo must never be used.

You’re a sharp, young adult, so write like one. Use proper punctuation and complete sentences. There’s no room for grammar mistakes in such emails, so read it over at least two times before you send your message.

Read the rest of this entry »



Does Texting Affect High School Students’ Grammar?

High school students use the least amount of words to send text messages. BTW (by the way,) IDK ( I don’t know,) or TTYL (talk to you later) are just a few abbreviated phrases text speakers use to get their text message across.

Finding out ways to communicate by using as little words as possible is an efficient way to communicate with buds. However, teachers are finding out that this chat-room lingo is making its way into the classroom.

“I think that students don’t even realize that they’re doing it,” said Allie Sakowicz, a senior at Maine South High School in Park Ridge, Ill. “When we’re using all this social media we’re not thinking about spelling words right, so naturally that’s going to translate into the classroom.”

Read the rest of this entry »



What is a Subordinating Conjunction

grockit logoGrockit is an online test prep and collaborative learning tool that allows students to practice tests in the three ways they naturally study – alone, with peers, and with experts. This guest blog was written by Jordan Schonig, a writer for Grockit.

As a continuation of our discussion on how to properly use conjunctions, we are now going to take a look at the subordinating conjunction.

Like coordinating conjunctions, subordinating conjunctions help to connect two independent clauses, but they can only do so by making one of the clauses dependent (i.e. subordinate). When I place a subordinating conjunction in front of an independent clause, I render that clause dependent, thereby facilitating its linkage with an independent clause. Read the rest of this entry »



What is a Coordinating Conjunction

grockitGrockit is an online prep and collaborative learning tool that allows students to practice tests in the three ways they naturally study – alone, with peers, and with experts. This guest blog was written by Jordan Schonig, a writer for Grockit.

Yes, I’m sure all of you know what a conjunction is; we’ve all heard the famous song in “School House Rock.” My goal is not to tell you the difference between “and,” “but,” and “or.” My goal is to explain how conjunctions are used to link phrases and clauses.

The SAT and ACT will likely test you on two kinds of conjunctions: coordinating conjunctions and subordinating conjunctions. Each type has its own set of rules that you must follow. Read the rest of this entry »





About

We help students find reviews on colleges, get help with student loan refinancing and other resourceful content to help students.

Social Links

© 2018 EDUInReview.com