hispanics

hispanics

High School Chant Gets Blown Out of Proportion

Since when does a group of high school students chanting “USA! USA!” during a school sporting event earn national media coverage? The answer seems to be “since now.”

During a recent high school basketball state playoff game in San Antonio, TX, a group of high school students who attend Alamo Heights High School began chanting the symbolic letters after their school’s team beat their rival, Edison High.

The seemingly-innocent chant has gained a lot of attention from news sources such as MSNBC, USA Today, and The Huffington Post, because it supposedly intersects race, sports, and politics. You see, the students at Alamo Heights are mostly white, but the students who attend Edison High are mostly Hispanic. Does it make a little more sense now?

When the students started chanting, Andrew Brewer, the head coach of the basketball team, quickly silenced them; the chanting only lasted about five seconds. The school superintendent, Kevin Brown, apologized for the students’ behavior and said that they would not be allowed to attend the state semifinal games as a punishment. However, these actions were not enough to please Gil Garza. Garza made a complaint to the governing body of Texas public schools three days after the event.

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Hispanics in Florida are Setting the New Higher Education Trend

For several years now, President Obama has been stressing the importance of higher education levels for all Americans. In order to be internationally competitive – which is becoming more and more important in today’s age – we have to have more people pursuing a college-level education. But where can this trend start? How do we convince parents who did not earn a higher education to encourage their children to further their studies? The answer could be the largest growing minority group in the U.S.: Hispanics.

Hispanics are expected to create the vast majority of our nation’s population growth between now and 2050. Currently, Hispanics comprise a little more than 20 percent of pre-kindergarten students through high school seniors. These students have not been known for pursuing a higher education in the past; in fact, for years they have had lower college graduation rates than the general population.

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Miami Dade College Celebrates 50 Years as a Model of Education for Hispanics

This week, Miami Dade College, or MDC, will celebrate its 50th year as center of learning for higher education. MDC has been known as a place that provides a college education to minority groups. The school has 171,000 students from 182 countries and serves as a place that offers college education to groups that need to improve their educational standards. The school has a very high reputation right now for the number of students it graduates each year.

The president of MDC is Eduardo Padron and he has been associated with MDC for the past 40 years. Padron believes strongly in the importance of education and the opportunities that a college degree allows beyond what a high school graduate can have. Because of the current political attention immigration is getting and the negative image that comes with it, Padron is seeking to reduce high school dropout rates among Hispanic students and boost educational standards. Padron has been named by President Obama as the chairman of the White House Initiative on Educational Excellence for Hispanic Americans. The goal of this project is to create education awareness and show that every citizen should be educated to enjoy the opportunities an education can bring.

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Hispanic Students to be Majority by 2023

Roughly one-fourth of the nation’s kindergartners are Hispanic, evidence of an accelerating trend that now will see minority children become the majority by 2023.

Census data released Thursday also showed that Hispanics make up about one-fifth of all K-12 students. Hispanics’ growth and changes in the youth population are certain to influence political debate, from jobs and immigration to the No Child Left Behind education, for years.

In colleges, Hispanics made up 12 percent of full-time undergraduate and graduate students, 2 percent more than in 2006. Still, that is short of Hispanics’ 15 percent representation in the total U.S. population.

“The future of our education system depends on how we can advance Hispanics through the ranks,” said William Frey, a demographer at the Brookings Institution in Washington. “In many cases it’s going to be a challenge, because they are the children of immigrants, and their English is not as strong. Many have parents without a high school or college education.”

Read more from the Associated Press.





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