ipad

ipad

Technology in the Classroom Might Not Be the Answer

typingFor almost 100 years, people have been predicting the end of the use of textbooks in public schools. The cause for the decline of textbook use is often due to some new technology that will forever change classrooms.

For example, in 1913, Thomas Edison was a nay-sayer concerning the future of textbook use.

“Books will soon be obsolete in the schools,” he said. “Our school system will be completely changed in 10 years.”

Edison was talking about replacing textbooks with videos to teach students. Sure, we do use videos today in our classrooms, but textbooks are still the main source of information in most cases.

So, should we be surprised that many education leaders, such as U.S. Education Secretary Arne Duncan and FCC Chairman Julius Genachowski, are now pushing for the use of laptops and digital books in the classroom? Using history as our source, the answer is no.

Read the rest of this entry »



Apple Ushers in a New Way of Learning with New Educational Apps

apple ipadLast week, Apple held a media event in New York City. At this event, the technology-gurus revealed their newest software programs, which could forever change the way that education takes place in the classroom. Currently, there are 1.5 million iPads that are being used in classrooms across the country. There are also more than 20,000 education and learning apps available in the app store. However, these numbers can both be expected to increase in the near future, thanks to the release of these new programs.

So what exactly did Apple announce? On January 19, 2012, Apple announced that it was updating the iBooks app, creating a new category of books in the iBookstore, and also releasing a DIY e-book creator. This means that there are now many more new tools that teachers and students can use in the classroom to learn.

Let’s take a look at all of the new options that Apple is offering to make learning even more interactive and technologically-based:

  • The new iBookstore will have a textbook category. These textbooks will be media-rich and interactive, allowing students to watch videos, play with diagrams, view pictures, and of course, read. These books will be available for students in grades K-12.
  • The new books available in iBooks 2 will have search options, making it easier to find what you are looking for in the index, glossary, dictionary, or the book itself. You will also be able to highlight important information in the books, a feature that many students find very useful.
  • Many of the books will feature a Question & Answer section at the end of every chapter. This will allow students to gauge how well they are learning the material and receive instant feedback on their progress.
  • The books on iBooks will cost $14.99 or less. This is much cheaper than traditional textbooks, which cost about $75 each. For schools that are facing budget cuts or need to save some cash, this will be a great way to do so.
  • A new app, iTunes U, will allow teachers to post their class syllabus, lectures, course assignments, and much more for students to see and access. This new app will allow teachers and students in grades K-12 use it; a previous version was only available for students at certain universities.
  • Read the rest of this entry »


Apple Could Announce New Distribution Platform for Digital Books

digital textbookIf you are an Apple fanatic like me, then you have probably heard that the company is holding a media event on Thursday, January 19, 2012. What is Apple releasing this time? According to ArsTechnica.com, the company will be announcing a new platform that will be the “GarageBand for e-books.” Basically, it will be a distribution platform for digital books and textbooks.

Although some makers of e-books claim that the process of making an e-book from a physical copy of a book is very simple, the truth is that the entire process can be very difficult and frustrating. This could all be changing very soon, if Apple does in fact announce a “GarageBand for e-books” software later this week.

Matt MacInnis worked for Apple until 2009, when he left the company and started his own company, Inkling, which creates digital textbooks. MacInis thinks that Apple is about to make it much easier to actually create these books.

Read the rest of this entry »



Cell and Cell Structure App Makes Biology Fun

I hated my freshman biology class! My professor was a billion years old and she made biology seem about as interesting as watching paint dry. Actually, one day, I did literally watch the paint dry on the wall across the hall instead of actively listening to my professor. Sadly, there were very few fun, interesting, and actually educational resources available in my classroom. If only my professor had an iPad.

Brand new to the Apple iPad, Cell and Cell Structure has been named one of the New and Noteworthy apps. So what is this app? Well, the name basically sums it all up. Cell and Cell Structure is a science-based app that teaches users about cells and their various structures through interactive activities, videos, and diagrams.

Read the rest of this entry »



Steve Jobs’ Education Background

American business man Steve Jobs is probably best known for being the former CEO of Apple Inc. He has also served as the chief executive of Pixar Animation Studio and has served as a member of the board of directors of The Walt Disney Company. On August 24, 2011, Jobs publicly announced his resignation from his job as the CEO of Apple and was then appointed chairman of the company’s board of directors. EDUinReview will now take a look at this creative man’s education background.

Jobs was born on February 24, 1955, in San Francisco, California. He was adopted by Paul and Clara Jobs; the couple also adopted another child, Patti, who became Jobs’ sister. His biological parents are Abdulfattah Handali and Joanne Simpson, who later married and had another child, Mona Simpson.

Jobs graduated from Homestead High School in Cupertino, California, in 1972. While in high school, Jobs spent his free time attending various after-school lectures at the Hewlett-Packard Company, where he also worked with Steve Wozniak as a summer employee.

After high school, Jobs attended Reed College for one semester but then dropped out. In 1974, he started going to Homebrew Computer Club meetings with Wozniak and began working for Atari. He saved his money and then traveled to India with a college friend, Daniel Kottke. He returned from India and continued working at Atari.

Read the rest of this entry »



Motion Math Zoom Helps Children Learn Basic Math Skills

When my mom first introduced me to numbers with decimal points, I was overwhelmed. “What is a thousandth? Shouldn’t it be bigger than a hundredth? Argh!!!!” Finally, my mom made a number line that helped me understand where the numbers belonged and everything started to make sense.

Fast forward twenty years or so and the hand-drawn number line of my childhood is being replaced with a much more interactive and fun way for kids to learn numbers and their place value: Motion Math Zoom.

Motion Math Zoom features an interactive time line that is illustrated by animals to help children learn basic math skills. For example, when students are learning about very small decimals, the numbers are represented by amoebas. Slightly larger whole numbers are represented by animals like ants and frogs, while really big numbers, like thousands, are represented by dinosaurs.

“It’s what you want to do, but also helps you learn,” said one child who has played the game.

Read the rest of this entry »



Become a Superhero and Learn Math with the Numbers League

For most young kids, superheroes are cool. Math is not cool. If only math were fun and could save the city from bad guys. Well the Numbers League app for iPads has used superhero powers to make basic math problems fun and entertaining, while also teaching children basic math skills.

The Numbers League game takes place in Infinity City, a futuristic world where bad guys lurk and the only force strong enough to stop them is the Numbers League. This team of superheroes uses the sum of their powers and strengths to fight the bad guys in a way that children are sure to enjoy. Parents can also get in on the fun because Numbers League allows up to four players to play at the same time.

Numbers League has three difficulty levels: simple addition, complex addition and basic subtraction, and negative numbers and simple multiplication. The different levels make it possible for both a five-year old child and a teenager to improve their math skills while still having fun.

Read the rest of this entry »



The Princeton Review’s SAT Score Quest App Helps Students Prepare for the SAT

All high school students know that taking the SAT exam is a milestone in your education process. You have to study for it for days on end, actually take the exam, wait for it to come back, and then, you might have to do the entire process all over again if you did not get the score you wanted.

Now, from the Princeton Review, comes a new iPad app called the SAT Score Quest. This app offers key concepts and advice for many difficult tasks on the SAT, such as how to use process of elimination to select the correct math answer and how to determine which vocabulary word to use based on context. Then, once you learn the core concepts, you can apply those concepts in the practice SAT sections included in the app. After you have completed each section, you can find out how you did with a free Score Report. You can also track your progress and see how far you have to go to reach your goals.

Read the rest of this entry »



Inkling Gets Support from Major Publishers to Create Digital Textbooks

Inkling Digital TextbooksInkling, the digital textbook startup, announced that it has won backing from two of the biggest textbook publishers. Among other investors, McGraw-Hill and Pearson are now giving Inkling access to an estimated 95 percent of textbooks available on the market today. However, Inkling’s production will only have about 100 titles, available only on the iPad, ready by the fall.

Currently, Inkling’s relatively slow rate of production is due to the company’s desire to create an interactive textbook that goes above and beyond the digital textbooks that are currently available. According to chief executive and founder Matt MacInnis, the new apps only use the existing textbook as a framework that ultimately casts off “the shackles of the book.” He argues that most digital textbooks are little more than PDF files of the original texts. “It only gets interesting when the content itself changes and begins to respond to your fingertips,” MacInnis said. He wants to work with authors to create new content that’s specifically built for the iPad.

Read the rest of this entry »



Vitamin Adventures of Don and Flip for iPad Offers a Lesson in Healthy Eating

Educational iPad AppOur wish has been granted! In my review of Punflay’s Kandy Fish app, I wrote that I hoped they would create a library of interactive stories. One of their newest iPad apps is another such story, called The Vitamin Adventures of Don and Flip. The interactive story is designed to teach kids about vitamins and the foods that have them.

The story follows Don and Flip as they intact with the fellow inhabitants of GoGoo Island and learn about the vitamins in different foods. Each food they encounter comes with a quick game, followed by a description of that vitamin. Kids will also learn what foods contain each vitamin and the list is unfalteringly healthy. In addition to the story book, there’s a learning page, that contains descriptions of each vitamin. Many of the storybook’s pages also feature interactive animations, in addition to the games.

Read the rest of this entry »





About

We help students find reviews on colleges, get help with student loan refinancing and other resourceful content to help students.

Social Links

© 2018 EDUInReview.com