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President Obama

President Obama Waives No Child Left Behind Requirements in 10 States

U.S. Department of Educaiton No Child Left Behind SealWhen No Child Left Behind was first created, everyone thought it would be a great thing and would really accomplish its goal of getting every child in the USA up to par in the fields of math and reading by 2014. However, with the deadline drawing closer and closer, it is becoming obvious that many schools are going to fall short. This is the reason why President Barack Obama recently let 10 states off the hook and freed them from the requirements that the program enforced on schools. The states are Colorado, Florida, Georgia, Indiana, Kentucky, Massachusetts, Minnesota, New Jersey, Oklahoma, and Tennessee.

President Obama said that he took action and released the states from their contracts because Congress has not updated the law, even though many agreed that it desperately needed to be fixed.

“If we’re serious about helping out children reach their potential, the best ideas aren’t going to come from Washington alone,” Obama said. “Our job is to harness those ideas, and to hold states and schools accountable for making them work.”

These 10 states aren’t the only ones who asked for a waiver to free them from No Child Left Behind. There are 28 other states that have plans on seeking waivers. Under the new waivers, the schools no longer have to prove that every student is proficient in reading and math; instead, the school must prepare students for either a higher education or a career, develop evaluation systems for teachers and principals, and establish new target goals for improvement among all students.

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President Obama Wants Kids to Stay in School Until They are 18-Years Old

President obamaIf you are thinking of dropping out of high school before you turn 18, you had better act fast because President Obama is trying to change the rules. In his recent State of the Union address, Obama called for all 50 states to not allow students to drop out of high school before they are 18-years old.

Although this is the first time that the national government is directly involving itself in this issue, many states have been struggling with it for a while now. For example, several states, including Alaska, Illinois, Kentucky, Maryland, and Rhode Island, all tried to pass legislation that would increase the age at which students could drop out of high school to 18-years old. However, Rhode Island was the only state that actually approved the legislative efforts and passed the law. For the other states, the dropout age remains firmly set at 16-years old.

“Efforts to raise the age usually come up against the argument that requiring students to stay in school when they no longer want to be there is disruptive to other students and not fair to the teacher,” said a senior policy analyst at the National Conference of State Legislatures, Sunny Deye. “Home-school groups often oppose raising the compulsory attendance age, and especially now, in this budget crunch, there are major concerns about the fiscal impact.”

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40 Percent of Students Majoring in STEM Subjects Change Majors

blue printsIn an effort to encourage students to enjoy science, President Obama held the first White House Science Fair last fall in the State Dining Room. During this event, he tested and played with various projects that students had made. This was just one way that President Obama has been trying to increase the USA’s international competitiveness in the STEM (science, technology, engineering, and math) industries.

For years, politicians and educators have been trying to think of ways to increase the level of interest that their students have in science. This is even more important today than it has been in the past, as Americans are competing with people from other countries for jobs in the international marketplace.

Sadly, it seems like most Americans are still losing interest in this fields shortly after their days of science fairs end. Why? According to David E. Goldberg, an emeritus engineering professor, it is because when they get to college, they face “the math-science death march.”

Recent studies show that 40 percent of college students who plan to pursue a major in the engineering or science fields change their majors or do not earn a degree at all. If you include pre-med students in this figure, the percentage jumps up to 60 percent. This is twice as much as the attrition rate of all other majors combined.

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President Obama Announces New Improvements for Head Start Program

National Head Start Alphabet Block LogoPresident Obama has been an advocate for improving the quality of education that children in the USA receive for years, and now, he has taken another step in this direction. On Tuesday, he announced some changes that are going to be made to the Head Start program. This program allows children from low-income families to attend preschool.

“This is the first time in history that Head Start programs will truly be held accountable for performance,” Obama said during a speech.

It is somewhat strange that Head Start has not been held accountable to the same standards as other  education programs, such as No Child Left Behind and other reform efforts. Under the current rules, preschools can continue to receive funding from Head Start even if they are not revising and improving their programs.

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USA Falling Behind in College Attainment Rates

Two years ago, President Obama announced plans to make the USA a leading country in the international education race by 2020. Many people were excited for this hope to become reality, but it seems like we might be slipping farther away from our goal.

According to a new report from the Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development, less Americans are completing their college education than young adults in other countries. This has made us fall from 12th to 16th place in the share of young adults (ages 25-34) who have earned a degree. The countries who are leading the race in this younger demographic are South Korea, Canada, and Japan.

Why is America slipping behind other countries in college attainment rates? There are two explanations for this. One is that more and more people are attending college in Asia and Europe than ever before. Another factor is that these foreign nations focus on education degrees that take less time to complete; instead of the four-year plans that many college in the USA follow, colleges in other countries offer many one-year or two-year degree plans.

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The NEA Supports President Obama’s Campaign for Re-Election in 2012

In early July, 2011, the National Education Association did something a year earlier that no one expected them to do. It was not an overhaul of the public education system nor was it the passing of a new rule that would improve the quality of school lunches. No, instead, the NEA publicly announced their endorsement of President Obama for re-election in 2012.

Representing more than 3,000,000 teachers, the NEA is the largest teachers’ union in the USA. The president of the NEA, Dennis Van Roekel, feels confident that supporting President Obama for re-election will make the organization’s members happy. He feels that the President “shares our vision for a stronger America.”

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Osama bin Laden’s Education Background

Osama bin Laden is a member of the Saudi bin Laden family, and who is probably best known for being the founder of the al-Qaeda terrorist organization, the man who was responsible for the September 11 terrorism attacks, and being Public Enemy Number One for the past ten years. EDUinReview will now take a look at this his education background.

Bin Laden was born March 10, 1957 in Riyadh, Saudi Arabia. His family was a very wealthy Arabic family. His parents divorced shortly after his birth and bin Laden was raised by his mother and step-father. He grew up with his four half-siblings: three brothers and one sister. He was raised as a devout Muslim and was very interested in religion throughout his life.

Bin Laden attended a secular school, Al-Thager Model School, from 1968-1976. He then attended King Abdulaziz University where he studied economics and business administration. There are several reports concerning what he earned his degree in; some say he earned a degree in civil engineering in 1979 while other claim he earned his degree in public administration in 1981. Read the rest of this entry »



Lesbian Cadet Rejected for Readmission to West Point

Cadet Katherine Miller

Cadet Katherine Miller

A lesbian cadet resigned last year from West Point due to the “don’t ask, don’t tell” policy, a law that bans openly gay soldiers from serving in the military. Katherine Miller, 21, who ranked ninth in her class, applied again to the military school, but sadly, even after the law was repealed, was denied readmission.

“While the don’t ask, don’t tell policy was recently changed and will be repealed, the effective date has not yet been determined,” Lt. Col. Sherri Reed, the academy’s director of public affairs, said in a statement. “Due to this situation, West Point is unable to offer her readmission at this time.”

Though Miller’s admission is currently being denied, Reed said that she will be able to be readmitted, but it will take some time.

“While at the academy Ms. Miller remained in good standing and had done exceptionally well academically, militarily and physically,” she said. “The choice to seek readmission is available to her once the repeal process is completed.”

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Raising Teachers’ Salaries to Improve Children’s Education

It’s no secret: teachers in the USA are not given the respect they deserve. These are the people who are shaping America’s future, but in many states, they are underpaid for their invaluable services to today’s youth. Now, with President Obama’s desire to improve the quality of education that children in our nation receive, it’s time to step back and take a look at the important role that teachers have in this process.

“Teaching in the U.S. is unfortunately no longer a high-status occupation,” said Andreas Schleicher, who monitors an international achievement test known as Pisa. “Despite the characterization of some that teaching is an easy job, with short hours and summers off, the fact is that successful, dedicated teachers in the U.S. work long hours for little pay and, in many cases, insufficient support from their leadership.”

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Less Than Half of New Jersey Students Graduate in Four Years

Graduation prospects are glum for New Jersey college students. Less than half will graduate with a bachelor’s degree in four years.

A Star-Ledger summary of graduation statistics from campuses around the state found that four-year graduation rates varied  from 6 percent at New Jersey City University to 90 percent at Princeton University. Data was gathered from the federal Department of Education’s latest statics, which were compiled in 2008.

“This is not the best we can do,” said Kean University President, Dawood Farahi. “We need to shift the paradigm. We need to focus on the student outcomes and the graduation of the students.”

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