Psychology

Psychology

Do You Have a ‘Fear of Missing Out?’

“Do you believe you’re missing out, that everything good is happening somewhere else?” – Brand New, “Jesus Christ”

In terms of eras, the age of social media is in its adolescence. Therefore, psychological conditions associated with social media are undeveloped, but they do exist. One such condition is the fear of missing out, or “FOMO.” FOMO is a disorder in which people are worried their friends might be having more fun and rewarding experiences than them.

For example, you’re stuck taking math 101 in summer school while your friends road trip to Lollapalooza. FOMO is characterized by an unrelenting desire to monitor or be connected with what your peers are doing. Researchers have developed a quiz to diagnose how bad you’ve got FOMO, take it here: The FOMO Quiz.

fomo

Feelings of inadequacy, anxiety, and depression can stem from the fear of missing out. Brooke Randolph, LMHC, resident mental health expert at DietsInReview.com, said this condition is relatively uncharted territory, and she’s “never treated someone with an unhealthy reliance on social media.” However, she says that if social media is managed correctly, FOMO won’t occur.

When I asked if social media strengthened bonds of friendship or created low self-esteem, she said, “Both can occur. It is dependent on how it is used and the perception of the user.”

There is no concrete evidence that social media use contributes to the development of psychological illnesses. Brooke even suggested that people with pre-existing social anxiety could benefit from social media. “For most people with social anxiety, social media allows them to control socialization to the amount of contact that works best for them,” said Brooke. One good component of social media platforms is the ability for the user to turn the on or off switch, but having the ability doesn’t mean they have the will power.

Everyone has been guilty of FOMO at one time or another. People text while driving or crossing a street, hop on Facebook at work, check Twitter during social gatherings and sporting events—all in the quest to find a more fulfilling social experience than the one they’re in. We don’t post pictures of our bills, dirty bath tubs, and prescriptions for a reason—we would hate to tarnish our reputation or give the idea our lives are normal and humdrum. We present ourselves in the most flattering light possible on social media sites to give the impression our lives are quite exceptional. There’s no shame in only sharing the more exquisite moments of your everyday life, but the sugar coated sheen we polish on our posts becomes a self-fulfilling prophecy of FOMO.

When we see someone else having a more privileged experience than us, we get bummed and try to one-up or match the idealized lush life. And so turns the FOMO wheel.

If you feel you display some of the symptoms of FOMO, I humbly invite you to put down the phone or close the laptop; having a concentrated, focused conversation with your pals is pretty refreshing, IMO. I know living IRL is tough, and while social media can make you feel super connected and important, your likes, shares, and retweets ain’t gonna be eulogized. Tweet if you liked the article!

Also Read:

University Offering Master’s Degree in Social Media 

Colleges Reaching Students Through Every Social Media Angle 

Teens are Texting All Night Long



Many Recent College Graduates Do Not Feel Pressured to Grow-Up and Settle Down

graduation hat and rolled up diplomaThere are several recognized life-stages that we must all go through in order to grow from childhood to adulthood. These include infancy, childhood, and adolescence. However, new research shows that recent college-graduates and their peers are actually still growing and maturing. This new life-stage is called “emerging adulthood” and it explains why many recent graduates do not seem to be in a rush to grow up.

In the past, students made the “transition to adulthood” by completing five milestones: finishing their education, leaving their parents’ home, gaining financial independence, getting married, and having a child. In 1960, about 71 percent of people had reached these milestones by age 30; in 2000, this number was only 38.5 percent for women and 21.7 percent for men.

So what does this mean for those of us who have recently graduated and are in our 20s? According to this new research, 20-somethings’ brains are still developing and they are also exploring their own identities. This can lead to instability and a feeling of being in-between adolescence and adulthood. However, this age group also has a new-found “sense of possibilities”  because they have so many options for what to do with their lives.

Read the rest of this entry »



How to Get a Job with Your Liberal Arts Degree

CV with penFears may start to set in once you’ve realized that your liberal arts degree may not be worth more than the piece of paper on which it was printed.  When job hunting becomes a headache, you may wish that you had chosen a more practical, specialized degree.

Concern may linger over the heads of you English, history, psychology, and other liberal arts majors, but don’t panic. Your degree has equipped you with certain skills that can be quite useful. Follow these tips to market your degree, and get a job.

Find an internship that has nothing to do with your degree: Bulk up your resume by taking an internship at a finance company or a local bank. Future employers need to see that the general education you learned in college can be applied to practical job skills. Additionally, having that real-world experience shows that you are mature and ready to take future jobs seriously.

Broaden your education: Take a few specialized classes outside your major that are beyond the required electives. For instance, if you’re a liberal arts major with a knack for numbers, take business calculus or an economics class.

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What’s Your Bachelor’s Degree Worth?

degree worthYou probably thought that earning a bachelor’s degree meant making more money. But with the current challenging job market, recent graduates aren’t receiving the starting salaries that they probably expected.

But there’s still hope on the horizon. Although starting salaries had been on a downhill slope, they are starting to stabilize.

2010 graduates’ average starting salary is $48,288, according to a survey organized by the National Association of Colleges and Employers, also known as NACE. While that’s 0.7 percent down from last year’s average starting salary, Marilyn Mackes, NACE executive director, said that the decline appears to be leveling off. Read the rest of this entry »



The Four Most Important Classes for Life

graduating manDo you ever wonder just how exactly your degree is going to help you in the real world? Your degree may give you a boost in your career, but what about life?

The sad truth is, you might be learning a lot of information that will not be useful to you after graduation.  However, if you follow the advice of Gregory Mankiw, a Harvard professor, and take classes that will prepare you for the “game of life,” you will receive a truly fulfilling education.

Mankiw thinks that there are four core areas that all students need to have at least a basic understanding of to be successful human beings: economics, statistics, finance, and psychology. Read the rest of this entry »



The Best Psychology Schools in the U.S.

diplomaThe field of psychology is one that will forever be needed, and thus, there will always be jobs available. Psychology is the scientific study of human mental functions and behaviors. From therapists to counselors, a psychology degree can get you involved in the field of helping people by helping them to understand themselves.

Those that want to go into this field can choose to earn a psychology undergraduate degree or choose to continue their education all the way up to the doctoral level. The higher your education in this field, the more responsibility you’ll have with your employment. Those with a psychology bachelor’s degree can find careers in case management, as a career counselor, rehabilitation specialist or psychiatric technician. However, psychology is usually one of those fields where most students choose to get an undergraduate degree as a stepping stone to higher level degrees. Read the rest of this entry »





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