Teen Pregnancy

Teen Pregnancy

86 Teen Pregnancies in Memphis High School

Teen pregnancy has been an American hot topic for decades and more recently has become prime time programming on our T.V. screens. Popular shows such as MTV’s “16 and Pregnant” and “Teen Mom” spark questions about the implications of glamorizing teen pregnancies. While rates for teen pregnancy in the United States have been on a steady decrease since the 1980’s, a concentration of teen mothers in Memphis, Tennessee proves the battle isn’t over.

A disturbing trend at Frayser High School in Memphis is motivating an emergency campaign. Of the 978 students attending Frayser, 86 girls are currently pregnant or had a baby within the last year. The staggering statistic leaves 18 percent of the student body pregnant, or a new mother. Girls Inc., a nonprofit organization, is stepping in to launch the fight against skyrocketing pregnancy rates at Frayser High.

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Girl Effect Aims to End Poverty and Malnutrition Through Education

There are 100 million fewer women than men around the world. In impoverished areas of the world, if a girl survives to adolescence, often times social constructs and even laws put them at a disadvantage to men. Poverty, poor medical care, lack of sexual protection, childbirth, and several other factors that prey on women all contribute to their shortened life expectancy. It is a viscous cycle; education can reduce poverty, but poverty causes education to become less of a priority or possibility.

Girl Effect aims to attack poverty, disease, war, social equality, and the world’s economy by educating girls in the developing world. It may sound idealistic, but there is much research behind the hypothesis that when girls are given any additional education, they are less likely to marry early, have children early, die from childbirth, contract HIV, and live in poverty. The Girl Effect also recognizes the different impact that women have versus men on their children and families. According to The Girl Effect Fact Sheet women reinvest 90 percent of income into their families, while men only reinvest 30 to 40 percent of income into their families. That means that educating a young girl and giving her the opportunity to earn an income will make her 50 percent more likely to reduce poverty in her family than if a young boy was given additional educational opportunities. Women can make powerful changes when given the opportunity.

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The Most Dangerous Form of Birth Control on the Market Today

ortho_evra_2Almost 50 percent of teens are sexually active, and more than 80 percent of these teens are using some sort of birth control to prevent unwanted pregnancies or protect against STDs. Unfortunately, a new report shows that one form of birth control that is meant to make having sex safer for users is actually causing injury and death.

Johnson & Johnson released Ortho Evra, commonly known as the birth control patch, in 2002, and it has been wildly successful ever since. Time magazine named it one the best inventions of the year, and since then, doctors have written almost 40 million prescriptions for this method of birth control.

However, a new report shows that there are some serious downsides to this product. Patient reports have revealed that users are 12 times more likely to suffer a stroke while taking this product and 18 times more likely to develop a blood clot, compared to tradition birth control pills.

The birth control patch delivers a continuous and high level of estrogen to the user for a week straight. Some experts suspect this elevated level of the hormone is what is causing the problem. Read the rest of this entry »



Current Trends Concerning Teens and Sexual Activity

sexMany young adults become sexually active during their teenage years. Sex is a natural human urge, so it is not surprising that many teens want to explore this unknown territory.

According to the Guttmacher Institute, 46 percent of teens have had sex at least once between the ages of 15 and 19. Not surprisingly, the percentage of sexually active teens increases with age: only 13 percent of 15-year-olds have had sex, but 70 percent of 19-year-olds have had sex.

Sexual education varies across the country. Some schools promote abstinence-only sexual education.  Others also promote contraceptive use to protect against sexually transmitted disease and pregnancies.

Which methods of birth control do sexually active teens use the most often? Read the rest of this entry »





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