EDU in Review News Blog

Bob Stoops Leads Highest Paid College Football Coaches

College football is one of America’s most celebrated sports. Millions of dollars are spent by fans on tickets, tailgating, sportswear and concessions. That doesn’t even begin to take into consideration the money spent by colleges on recruiting players, paying coaches, putting uniforms on the team and paying for players scholarships. The college football industry is driven by fans, tradition and money. Winning games means more money, more students wanting to go to the school and more fans.bob stoops

One expense that highly winning football schools pay close attention to is the football coach’s salary. Schools with more winning programs pay their coaches a lot more than those with mediocre programs. If a coach wins a national championship or consistently goes to the more prominent bowl games, he’s pretty much able to write his own ticket.

No matter what, the coaches with the highest salaries have worked to get the best results from their players and for their schools. As of 2009, the highest paid college football coaches, with their yearly salaries, are:

With these high salaries come the high pressures of a highly paid college football coach. Fans are quick to weigh in on if they think a coach is worth the money, and as soon as the team starts losing, there is talk of being replaced. Of course these coaches are where they are because they know how to win year after year.

Multimillion dollar salaries don’t come without their share of stress and sacrifices. The highest paid college football coaches spend most of their time either traveling for recruiting purposes, at practice preparing for games, on the road at away games and handling press conferences related to team news.

Often times their families hardly see or get to spend time with them, especially during season. But when they are successful, their price tag continues to go up. It takes a lot of skill to be the best in this field. The top ten are paid handsomely because they have continued to get results for the schools they represent.

Salaries taken from BleacherReport.com






5 Responses to “Bob Stoops Leads Highest Paid College Football Coaches”

  1. College Football 2011: Championship Weekend | Edu in Review Blog says:

    [...] Both schools enter the game chasing championship dreams with the Big 12 title on the line for the winner of the contest. OSU is looking to avoid their ninth consecutive loss to the Sooners and keep their national championship hopes alive with a victory. OU is seeking their eight Big 12 title under Bob Stoops. [...]

  2. College Football Gets a Little Safer with Concussion Test | Edu in Review Blog says:

    [...] may have less to worry about. A concussion test is being researched for its potential use by coaches. According to a 2009 study, more than 40 percent of high school students return to action too soon [...]

  3. Stoopsfan35 says:

    There’s a good reason Bob Stoops is highest paid among his peers; 1 National Championship season in 2000, 3 other National Championship appearances, 3 BCS Bowl games, 7 Conference titles, several Coach of the Year awards, and 12 winning seasons, countless 1st team all americans, countless NFL Draft pics, 2 heisman quarterbacks-Jason White and Sam Bradford, and last but definitely not least…..Adrian Peterson.

  4. lawyers in Las Vegas says:

    The layout of your weblog is absolutely messed up when I view it in Opera. Plz fix it.

  5. Press3copz says:

    In Div-I and pro sports I understand it’s not a “sport” it’s a “business”. The kids are used as pawns, the coaches, schools, and the NCAA ALL benefit FINANCIALLY from these kids efforts. And we wonder why when they get to the pros they want to get paid?….DUH!

    And please don’t use the “education” line as an EXCUSE. If you gave me $50K and I gave you $3-5M back (legally), would you do it?…Enough said.

    I’m not for paying college athletes, but if an engineering student can drive a friend dad’s car and stay at their condo, why can’t an athlete?


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