kansas

kansas

Smut or Shakespeare: Kansas Senate Defines What’s Appropriate for the Classroom

If you’re a student (or know a student) in Kansas, major changes may be coming to your curriculum. The state’s Senate has recently passed a bill (SB56) removing legal protections for educators in schools for using curriculum methods that may be viewed as harmful to minors. However, the legislation did not remove the same protections for educators at colleges and universities.

kansas capitol

Seen by supporters as a way to protect minors from “offensive content,” the measure gained traction after a poster in a Johnson County middle school spurred some parents’ ire. The poster, displayed as part of sex-education curriculum, asked the question “How do people express their sexual feelings?” Answers to that question included intercourse and anal sex. None of the answers to the question were depicted in any way on the poster other than with words. Some parents were offended by the posters’ content, and it was removed by the school.

The tide then turned to other materials which some could consider inappropriate, culminating in the bill passing in the Kansas Senate. It will now go to the state’s House of Representatives. The bill would allow for teachers, principals and other educators to be charged with misdemeanors for disseminating and/or displaying materials determined to be harmful to minors.

Nathan Whitman, educator from Burrton High School in Kansas, helped clear up exactly what the “offensive content” would be. He said, “inappropriate content called ‘harmful to minors’ as defined by SB56 is ‘any description, exhibition, presentation or representation, in whatever form, of nudity, sexual conduct, sexual excitement or sadomasochistic abuse when the material or performance, taken as a whole or, with respect to prosecution for an act described by subsection (a)(1), that…the average adult person…find[s]…[appeals to a] prurient interest in sex to minors[;]…depicts or describes nudity, sexual conduct, sexual excitement or sadomasochistic abuse in a manner that is patently offensive to prevailing standards in the adult community[;]…lacks serious literary, scientific, educational, artistic or political value.'”

Read the rest of this entry »



Supreme Court Rules Kansas Public Schools are Underfunded

Crowded classrooms, higher fees, fewer after-school programs and staff – if you’re thinking that all sounds like a scholastic nightmare, you’re close. It’s the reality of education in Kansas.

classroom

The Kansas government made the decision to cut certain funding to schools as a way to help get the state through the “Great Recession.” The cuts made led to a lawsuit being filed in 2010 on behalf of parents and school districts who felt the state had harmed students, especially those in poorer districts. The case has now been ruled on by the Kansas Supreme Court, and they have found the current funding levels in Kansas public schools to be unconstitutional.

Read the rest of this entry »



ACT Scores Reveal High School Students are Not Ready for College

Across the country, high school juniors and seniors are preparing for college. When I was in high school years ago, I was in tons of organizations, volunteered, and took more honors and AP courses than a high schooler should take. I did everything I could to build my resume for college and kept my GPA high. The next item I had to put on my college resume was my ACT score. Let’s just say my ACT score proved that I wasn’t as brilliant as I thought.

What is the ACT? The ACT is a national college admissions exam, testing students in five subject areas of English, math, reading, science, and writing. The highest an individual can score on their ACT is 36. Scoring a 36 almost guarantees admission into any university in the nation and large amounts of scholarship money. Across the country, universities request students to send college applications with an ACT and SAT score. But, in the Midwest, it is common for potential college students to send in just an ACT score.

Kansas ACT scores for 2012 are similar to the previous year, according to The Wichita Eagle. The data released Wednesday revealed students in the class of 2012 are not ready for college. About half of all US high school students scored below the average ACT score, a 21.1. High school classes of 2012 in Kansas had an ACT score average of 21.9, compared to last year’s average score of 22. Read the rest of this entry »



Verizon Wireless Awards Kansas Department of Education a $30,000 Grant

moblie communications companyIf students in Kansas are about to sign up with a cell phone provider, they should probably consider signing on with Verizon Wireless. This isn’t based on the cost of quality of cell phone service that the provider offers in the state, but instead it based on a somewhat strange factor. What is this factor? The fact that the cell phone company recently announced plans to donate $30,000 to the Kansas Department of Education in a grant.

The grant will be given to the state in order to help fund the training of teachers on the Common Core Standards for English Language Arts and Mathematics. These standards were adopted by the state of Kansas in October 2010 and the funds will be used in the implementation of the plan.

“Verizon Wireless is proud to support the Kansas Department of Education and its undertaking to implement the Common Core Standards in classrooms across the state,” said Brendan Fallis, the Verizon Wireless president of the Kansas/Missouri region. “The standards are designed to be robust and relevant to the real world, reflecting the knowledge and skills needed for success in college and careers. With American students fully prepared for the future, our communities will be best positioned to compete successfully in the global economy.”

Read the rest of this entry »



Student Suspended for Refusing to Kill Chicken

baby-chickenConcordia High School offers students a class on animal science and food production, with the intention of teaching them about food production. By the time student Whitney Hillman found out that the class involved raising and slaughtering a chicken, it was too late to for her to drop it. So, when the kill day came, she decided to take things into her own hands and kidnap her chicken, saving it from slaughter.

“I got two days in-school suspension, but I don’t care,” Whitney told The Wichita Eagle. “They made him my pet and then wanted me to kill him. I couldn’t do that.” She took the class because she wants to study zoology in college.

Although Whitney always earned good grades, she knew that killing a chicken she had raised would not be an assignment she could complete. She told her mother and stepfather about her plan and they agreed to let her carry out the poultry abduction. “Later that day, I took Whitney back to school to turn herself in,” said Whitney’s mother, Kristina Frost. “I told her, ‘This is farm country. I’m glad you’re strong.’ ” Frost criticized the school for making the students bond with animals intended for food.

Read the rest of this entry »



Kansas Universities Lower Degree Requirements

Kansas University

Kansas University

When I was accepted to the University of Oklahoma, I received a list of all of the classes and hours I would need in order to graduate. I’ve been chipping away at my required hours for four years, and finally graduation is in sight.

With those numbers being your end goal for so long, can you imagine if the requirements for graduation changed while you were a student? What if suddenly a change in requirements affected when you would graduate? For students at universities in Kansas, this is an issue they now have to face.

According to the Associated Press, The Kansas Board of Regents announced on October 21, 2010 that they would decrease the minimum number of hours needed for a bachelor’s degree from 124 to 120. This will affect students, but not necessarily in a bad way. Students now need less education to graduate than they did last semester, which will make graduating easier. Read the rest of this entry »



Teachers Allowed to Hit Students in 20 U.S. States

the 20 states allowing student hitting

The 20 States in red currently allow teachers to legally hit their misbehaving children

Most parents recognize that even in the most well-respected and established education institutions, their children will inevitably misbehave, which will subject them to punishment in accordance to the school’s disciplinary guidelines.

In fact, in most instances, parents, teachers and administrative professionals understand and agree that negative reinforcement is sometimes deemed necessary when disciplining a disruptive pupil. Most, however, envision a trip to the principal’s office or a missed after school activity an appropriate punishment.

One thing they probably don’t envision is a child being hit with a belt or wooden paddle as an appropriate punishment for misbehavior. Read the rest of this entry »



Kansas State Senior Wins Texting Competition

Image via Kansas State Collegian

Image via Kansas State Collegian

Amanda Mitchem learned it pays to be able to text fast. The senior at Kansas State University won $1,000.00 in the U.S. Cellular Speed Texting Contest at the Kansas state fair this weekend. Mitchem made it through four rounds before claiming her prize. “I was very excited,” she said. “It was a shock.”

The competition is judged on accuracy in addition to speed. Contestants had to text a phrase to a specific number as soon as it appeared on a display.

Read the rest of this entry »



Kansas Student’s Test Correction Not Really News to Fellow Classmates

I got online to check my email and a few other things when a headline caught my eye and a picture of someone I know. A fellow Junior International Baccaulaureate classmate, Geoff Stanford, had recently caught an error in this year’s Writing Kansas State Assessment. But is this really something to make such a big deal over?geoff stanford

As I glanced over comments that had been left by others, I could see that many readers agreed with me. Good for Geoff for catching this error, but a typo is not worth this much fuss. Typos occur on a daily basis and many times go unreported, because due to context clues, the typo can be ignored, or in this case, the correct word can easily be determined. I realize, playing the devil’s advocate with myself, that the word originally being “emission” got changed to “omission,” which can completely change the meaning of the sentence. But context, as I said, is key. Geoff and the reporters, I believe, mentioned that the writing prompt dealt with the Greenhouse Effect and Carbon dioxide and I’m sure most students were fully capable of realizing this was a mistake.

As all the teachers were notified across Kansas, was it really necessary to make an article over this simple mistake? As the spokeswoman for the State Department of Education, Karla Denny, said “We’re human.” and this is true. This mistake could have happened to anyone anywhere and to make such a big deal out of it is simply ridiculous in my opinion. Congratulate the boy and don’t worry about making it a big deal.



Kansas High School Student Corrects State Test Error

Geoffrey Stanford’s teachers always tell him to read tests carefully.geoffrey stanford

Every sentence. Every word. Slow down. Make sure you understand what’s being asked, and then proceed.

So while taking his state writing test last week, the East High junior saw something that didn’t make sense: The word “emission” — as in “the emission of greenhouse gases” — was spelled “omission.”

“I thought, ‘Surely they’re not talking about leaving out carbon dioxide altogether.’ It just didn’t make sense,” said Stanford, 17. “It had to be a mistake.”

It was.

Read more at Kansas.com about how this student caught something test developers and teachers had missed. Soon, our very own Becca Driskill, an international baccaulaureate classmate of Stanford’s, will have her reaction.





About

We help students find reviews on colleges, get help with student loan refinancing and other resourceful content to help students.

Social Links

© 2018 EDUInReview.com