ACT

ACT

Major Changes are Coming to the SATs: Here’s What You Can Expect

1600 is perfect again! On the SAT that is. On March 5, the College Board announced its plans for a redesigned SAT which will be introduced in the spring of 2016.

SAT

The updated exam will feature three sections: “evidence-based” reading and writing, mathematics, and an essay. The essay portion will be optional, which goes against the previous change made to the SAT in 2005.

Makers of the SAT said the new exam will feature “relevant” vocabulary words students are likely to encounter in college, a more in-depth focus on fewer math topics, and questions asking students to cite specific passages supporting their answers.

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ACT Scores Reveal High School Students are Not Ready for College

Across the country, high school juniors and seniors are preparing for college. When I was in high school years ago, I was in tons of organizations, volunteered, and took more honors and AP courses than a high schooler should take. I did everything I could to build my resume for college and kept my GPA high. The next item I had to put on my college resume was my ACT score. Let’s just say my ACT score proved that I wasn’t as brilliant as I thought.

What is the ACT? The ACT is a national college admissions exam, testing students in five subject areas of English, math, reading, science, and writing. The highest an individual can score on their ACT is 36. Scoring a 36 almost guarantees admission into any university in the nation and large amounts of scholarship money. Across the country, universities request students to send college applications with an ACT and SAT score. But, in the Midwest, it is common for potential college students to send in just an ACT score.

Kansas ACT scores for 2012 are similar to the previous year, according to The Wichita Eagle. The data released Wednesday revealed students in the class of 2012 are not ready for college. About half of all US high school students scored below the average ACT score, a 21.1. High school classes of 2012 in Kansas had an ACT score average of 21.9, compared to last year’s average score of 22. Read the rest of this entry »



The Future of College Admissions: SAT, ACT, and Admissions Rates

Many students think of the ACT and SAT as tests they have to take to get into college. They study a little bit, take the test, and then apply to the schools where their scores are deemed acceptable. However, the world of college admissions is changing and these tests might not hold as much sway in the future.

Currently, there are 850 colleges and universities in the USA that have an SAT/ACT optional admissions policy. This means that students do not have to take these standardized tests in order to be accepted. Some of the schools that have adopted this policy include Indiana State University, Johnson & Wales University, and Kansas State University.

Some people are in favor of this new trend concerning college admissions because they argue that the tests are “a cocktail of trickery [that do not allow] enough time, and [require] idiosyncratic ways of thinking,” as Anthony Russomanno of the Princeton Review said. The SAT and ACT were originally designed to create a bell-curve distribution of test scores, but opponents say that this does not prove the tests are fair. Instead, they say that the tests would be fair if students could study for them in a similar way that students can study for other tests, such as AP and IB exams. Read the rest of this entry »



Shmoop Makes Learning More Fun

Shmoop website logoHave you ever wanted to learn about an academic subject – such as literature, economics, Shakespeare, or biology – but did not want to be bored to death as some old professor droned on and on about it? Well have no fear. There’s a new website that will teach you these things while also making you “a better love (of literature, history, life).” It’s called Shmoop.

Shmoop is a website that makes learning and writing more fun and also more relevant for everyone. They do this by reviewing topics that you really care about in a voice that is simple to read and actually pretty funny. They also teach you how to write papers, speak more intelligently in classes, and “make studying less of a snooze-fest.” Sounds like a good thing to me!

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The State of Arizona Uses a New Test to Determine If Students Are Ready for College

High school students in Arizona might have a bigger worry than if they will win their football games this year. A new study reveals that many of them are not on track to pursue a college education.

In January 2011, the ACT Explore standardized test was given to almost 20,000 eighth-grade students and it showed that many of these students are likely to not be able to pass a college entrance exam, even though 62 percent hope to pursue a four year degree. The test also surveys the students about their interests in order to be able to offer advice concerning future careers. However, if the students are not able to pursue a higher education, their future career options will be limited.

How should the schools combat this discouraging news? Many are planning on using the results to place students in remedial or advanced high school classes, depending on how the students did on the exam. Sadly, this means that about a third of the students will be placed in advanced classes for math and reading, while half will be on track for English classes. The worst of the news concerns science: only 10 percent of the students are on track for this subject.

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Free SAT, ACT and PSAT Testing During Test Fest

Princeton Review LogoMarch is The Princeton Review’s National Test Fest, and to celebrate, they’re offering free practice college-entrance exams. Taking a practice test not only gives you the opportunity to get familiar with the test format, it also can help you figure out where you need improvement and how to best prepare for the actual exam.

The Princeton Review also offers high school students an evaluation tool to help them determine if they will do better on the ACT or SAT. Called The Princeton Review Assessment (PRA), it helps you make the most of your options as more and more colleges and universities accept both exam scores.

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Save on Test-Prep with Limited Time Offers from The Princeton Review

Test Prep CoursesMany studies have shown that students who enroll in test-prep courses perform better on standardized test than those who don’t. But worrying about the cost of these courses shouldn’t be an additional source of stress. Here to help are special discounts for anyone who’s planning on taking the MCAT, SAT, ACT, GRE or GMAT from The Princeton Review. They offer a variety of classroom and online classes, you can fit test-prep into even the busiest of schedules and are one of the leaders in the field.

These limited-time offers include:

  • Save $225 on a GMAT Classroom course if you enroll between January 14 and February 15.
  • Save $225 on an MCAT Classroom or LiveOnline course if you enroll before February 2.
  • Save $175 on an SAT or ACT Classroom or LiveOnline course if you enroll before February 15.
  • Save $225 on a GRE Classroom or LiveOnline course if you enroll between January 14 and February 15.

Sign up here for this special EduInReview discount!



What is a Coordinating Conjunction

grockitGrockit is an online prep and collaborative learning tool that allows students to practice tests in the three ways they naturally study – alone, with peers, and with experts. This guest blog was written by Jordan Schonig, a writer for Grockit.

Yes, I’m sure all of you know what a conjunction is; we’ve all heard the famous song in “School House Rock.” My goal is not to tell you the difference between “and,” “but,” and “or.” My goal is to explain how conjunctions are used to link phrases and clauses.

The SAT and ACT will likely test you on two kinds of conjunctions: coordinating conjunctions and subordinating conjunctions. Each type has its own set of rules that you must follow. Read the rest of this entry »



How to Read Your SAT Scores

classroomBetween deciding what colleges to apply to and then filling out your college applications, getting into college is stressful. On top of selecting, applying and getting accepted into a college, there are the ever-dreaded standardized tests. Most schools base their acceptance of a student on their high school GPA, high school extracurricular activities and standardized test scores. Each college varies on which version of standardized test that they require for acceptance, whether it be the SAT (Scholastic Assessment Test) or the ACT (American College Test) but standardized tests are a must for the college-bound student.

The stress of these tests is huge, but reading the scores can be just as intimidating. Prior to taking your test of choice, (it doesn’t hurt to take both, if you are still undecided) you can arrange to have your scores sent directly to the colleges and universities of your choice, but you’ll want to know your scores, and what they mean, to see if all your hard work paid off.

For those taking the SAT, the following information can help you become comfortable with reading your SAT test scores so that you’re ready when you receive them. Read the rest of this entry »



Princeton Review Offers Discounts for Classroom and LiveOnline Courses

princeton review

This offer is expired. See current offers from The Princeton Review here.

The Princeton Review recently declared March 20th National Testing Day and offered free ACT, SAT, and PSAT practice tests to anyone who signed up. It was a great opportunity for students to become more familiar with the nerve racking tests and to find out which areas they struggled with the most.

Students who study with the Princeton Review are guaranteed to see results after studying with expert instructors and comprehensive study materials. The Princeton Review has small class sizes to guarantee personalized attention and customized courses to make sure you can attend a course at a time that is convenient for you.

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