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Here are the Top 10 Universities, According to U.S. News

Love ’em or hate ’em the annual U.S. Rankings of the country’s universities have been revealed. Though many accuse the rankings of being an outdated system where the same schools always rise to the top, they can be an interesting way to compare some of the many institutions of higher education in the country.

princeton

Though you really can’t narrow the college experience down to a few measurable data points, the people behind the U.S. News rankings try their best to determine what combination of factors creates the nation’s top schools. Factors considered include student retention, faculty resources, student selectivity, financial resources, alumni giving, and graduation rates.

Based on those factors and more, here are the top 10 American universities for 2015.

10. California Institute of Technology
Tuition and fees (2014-2015): $43,362
Enrollment: 977
The student-to-faculty ratio at the California Institute of Technology is 3:1. Its students are actively involved in research projects with NASA, the National Science Foundation and the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services.

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The Future of College Admissions: SAT, ACT, and Admissions Rates

Many students think of the ACT and SAT as tests they have to take to get into college. They study a little bit, take the test, and then apply to the schools where their scores are deemed acceptable. However, the world of college admissions is changing and these tests might not hold as much sway in the future.

Currently, there are 850 colleges and universities in the USA that have an SAT/ACT optional admissions policy. This means that students do not have to take these standardized tests in order to be accepted. Some of the schools that have adopted this policy include Indiana State University, Johnson & Wales University, and Kansas State University.

Some people are in favor of this new trend concerning college admissions because they argue that the tests are “a cocktail of trickery [that do not allow] enough time, and [require] idiosyncratic ways of thinking,” as Anthony Russomanno of the Princeton Review said. The SAT and ACT were originally designed to create a bell-curve distribution of test scores, but opponents say that this does not prove the tests are fair. Instead, they say that the tests would be fair if students could study for them in a similar way that students can study for other tests, such as AP and IB exams. Read the rest of this entry »



John Turturro’s Education Background

John Turturro is an American actor, director, and writer who has appeared in more than 60 films, many of which with Adam Sandler. He is best known for his roles in O Brother, Where Are Thou?, Quiz Show, and Barton Fink. His next film to hit the big screen will be Transformers: Dark of the Moon, in which he will co-star with Shia LaBeouf. EDUinReview will now take a look at this talented actor’s education background.

Tuturro was born on February 28, 1957, in Brooklyn, New York. His parents are Katherine and Nicholas Turturro. His parents were both Italian and Turturro was raised in the Roman Catholic religion. He has one brother, Nicholas. He attended the State University of New York at New Paltz and earned his Masters of Fine Arts degree from Yale‘s School of Drama.

Turturro first got a taste of professional acting when he appeared as an extra in Martin Scorsese’s movie, Raging Bull, in 1980. In 1984, he began to develop a close partnership with Spike Lee when he was cast in Do the Right Thing. The pair has worked together on other films, including Jungle Fever, Summer of Sam, and Miracle at St. Anna. He has also developed a good relationship with the Coen Brothers and has appeared in several of their movies, including The Big Lebowski and O Brother, Where Art Thou?.

Turturro won an Emmy award for his reoccurring role of Ambrose Monk on the popular USA Network series, Monk. Recently, he has acted in The Good Shepherd in 2006 and became involved in the Transformers movies, where he portrays Sector 7 Agent Simmons.

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Yale Fraternity is Suspended for Sexist Chants

In October 2010, the Delta Kappa Epsilon fraternity at Yale University marched their pledges through campus, chanting explicit phrases such as “No Means Yes” and phrases about various sexual acts, including necrophilia. Many of these chants were very discriminatory and demoralizing towards women. The fraternity was chastised for the event and chapter leaders apologized. Then, the fraternity’s national office demanded that the chapter not continue with any pledge activities for the rest of the year.

The members of Delta Kappa Epsilon (DKE) probably thought this was the end of their punishment, but in May 2011, USA Today reported that Yale University had decided to ban the fraternity from recruiting new members or holding any activities on the school’s campus for five years. This will be quite a change for the school’s Greek life because DKE has been an active fraternity at Yale since it was founded there in 1855.

Yale officials claim that disciplining DKE by forbidding them from recruiting and holding activities on campus in order to protect “an educational environment free from harassment and intimidation.”

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Yale and Columbia Reinstate the Navy R.O.T.C. Program

For decades, there has not been any type of military presence on Yale University‘s campus. R.O.T.C programs across the country were kicked off college campuses during the Vietnam War, when students protested against the war. However, more recently, these programs have been kept off campuses at many schools due, in a large part, to the military’s “don’t ask, don’t tell” policy regarding homosexuality, which many students disapproved of. This policy was recently overturned, and now, Yale officials have signed an agreement with the Navy to reinstate a R.O.T.C program at the school, starting in the Fall 2012 semester.

The idea to reinstate a R.O.T.C program began last fall, when a student survey found that a majority of Yale students were in favor of renewing the relationship between the Navy R.O.T.C program and the school. A vote by Yale’s faculty in early May sealed the deal, allowing R.O.T.C to become a part of campus life again.

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Jodie Foster’s Education Background

Jodie Foster is an American actress who was born on November 19, 1962. Her parents are Brandy and Lucius Foster; she is the youngest of four children. Before Foster was born, her father left her mother. Her mother had to support the family by working as a film producer, so Foster has been exposed to the film industry from a very young age. EDUinReview will now take a look at the education background of this intelligent actress.

Foster first began acting in commercials for Coppertone suntan lotion when she was only three years old. She first performed on television when she appeared on The Doris Day Show, in the same year that her first movie, Menace on the Mountain, was released in 1970. In 1976, she made her claim to fame when she appeared in Taxi Driver with Robert DeNiro.

Foster did not let her early acting successes distract her from her education. She was the valedictorian of her French-language prep-school, Lycée Francais de Los Angeles, in 1980. Foster is fluent in French, due to her education and the fact that she lived in France several times during her youth. In addition to French, Foster speaks English, Italian, and understands German.

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Top Five Public Universities for Ivy League Alternatives

ivy-leagueJust like Blair on Gossip Girl has dreamed of going to Yale since childhood, many students simply won’t be happy unless they are accepted to an Ivy League school. Some are driven since birth to maintain a perfect educational reputation, and some will do whatever it takes to attend the school of their dreams. In the end, is it worth the extreme hard work and dedication? After all, what’s in a name, as long as you get a top education and don’t owe more than what your parent’s house is worth when it is all said and done.

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Rejection: Some Colleges Do It Better Than Others

Getting in to the college of your choice is harder than ever these days. Competition is stiff, and space is limited. Colleges have the difficult job of hand selecting their prospective freshman classes, and unfortunately have to reject thousands of talented and bright students. The result? A mass number of rejection letters, often hitting kids harder than a break-up.

College rejection letters

Rejected: photo via WSJ.com

“Even with impressive test scores and grades, abundant extracurricular activities, good recommendations and an admission essay into which ‘I poured myself heart and soul,’ Daniel Beresford, 18, netted 14 rejection letters from 17 applications.” Beresford was denied by Harvard, Yale, Johns Hopkins and the University of Chicago. (He’s bound for one of his top choices, Pepperdine.)

Here are some of the cruelest and kindest rejection letters from colleges and universities. Read the rest of this entry »



Academic Earth Providing Free College Courses and Lectures Online

academic earthJust before YouTube EDU was unveiled, Academic Earth came online, and very quickly the “free college video” niche created some formidable competition. While YouTube EDU is an aggregation of all the existing education-related content on the video leader’s site, Academic Earth is the brain child of Richard Ludlow.

He was a Yale student, studying linear algebra, and sought additional information online to help him through the course. What he found was a full-length course via video with Gilbert Strang, an MIT math professor. He figured he wasn’t the only one seeking this kind of information, and after doing research learned that educational resources online were scattered across many different resources. Thus, he brought them together at Academic Earth. Read the rest of this entry »



Harvard’s Endowment and the Education Bubble

harvard endowmentFueled by endowment gains and tuition increases, universities in recent years have gone on a building, faculty and program expansion spree. I have personally seen it in the law school realm. Instead of the historical 12-credit loads, the norm over the past few years in law schools has trended towards nine to ten credits. This allowed for more research, but also meant that the faculty needed to expand to continue offering the same course levels. Salaries also rose as law schools and other areas of universities competed for top talent.

But the same forces buffeting the general economy are affecting the university.

Yale recently froze all faculty salaries for employees paid more than $75,000, and Harvard froze all faculty salaries at its arts and sciences school. The big private, elite universities appear to be particularly at risk. To understand why, let’s take a look at the Harvard endowment.

Read more at New York Times





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