Duke University

Duke University

Here are the Top 10 Universities, According to U.S. News

Love ’em or hate ’em the annual U.S. Rankings of the country’s universities have been revealed. Though many accuse the rankings of being an outdated system where the same schools always rise to the top, they can be an interesting way to compare some of the many institutions of higher education in the country.

princeton

Though you really can’t narrow the college experience down to a few measurable data points, the people behind the U.S. News rankings try their best to determine what combination of factors creates the nation’s top schools. Factors considered include student retention, faculty resources, student selectivity, financial resources, alumni giving, and graduation rates.

Based on those factors and more, here are the top 10 American universities for 2015.

10. California Institute of Technology
Tuition and fees (2014-2015): $43,362
Enrollment: 977
The student-to-faculty ratio at the California Institute of Technology is 3:1. Its students are actively involved in research projects with NASA, the National Science Foundation and the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services.

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Top College Choices That Aren’t Ivies

You’ve taken the necessary tests and sent in your applications. Now you wait. College applications season is a stressful one, but there may be nothing more stressful than waiting to hear back from your top choices. For those out there who set their sights on an Ivy League school, waiting can be extra worrisome.

williams college

If you’re worried about getting into an Ivy or already know you didn’t, why not check out some other colleges and universities that are just as great and have a higher acceptance rate? Ivies aren’t the only schools out there, and these 10 schools, according to the Fiske Guide to Colleges: Beyond the Ivies, are just as academically outstanding.

Amherst College
This private liberal arts school may be small, it enrolled 1,785 students in 2013, but it’s one of the top-ranked schools in the country. It’s also exclusively undergraduate.

Duke University
Duke is a private research university located in North Carolina. Not only does it have excellent academics, but I’m sure you’re familiar with Duke’s athletic reputation as well.

Massachusetts Institute of Technology
MIT is known for its prowess in the fields of physical sciences and engineering. It may be as difficult to get into as an Ivy, but if you want to major in the sciences, it’s certainly worth some consideration.

Pomona College
Located in Southern California, Pomona College is a liberal arts school that focuses on the arts, humanities, social sciences, and natural sciences.

Stanford University
A leading research and teaching university, Stanford is another well-known California school. Not only does it feature great academics, but it has one of the most unique college mascots: a tree.

Swarthmore College
This unique college focuses on liberal arts and engineering curriculum. It also has a noted Honor’s Program and strives to integrate ethical and social responsibility into all programs.

University of Chicago
This is a private research university in the heart of one of the Midwest’s biggest cities. Its location offers many cultural benefits and allows for a different educational experience than you might get in a traditional college town.

Wellesley College
Noted as the top liberal arts college for women, Wellesley may be a school you’ve not heard of, but it’s definitely one you should consider.

Wesleyan College
The second women’s-only college on the list is Wesleyan. Another private liberal arts college, Wesleyan recently added the option for students to take an additional class over winter break so they could experience a class that may be higher in demand during the semester.

Williams College
A four-year liberal arts college, Williams offers more than 30 majors in 24 different departments. It also is the number one liberal arts college in the United States according to a recent ranking.

Image from williams.edu

Also Read:

6 Skills Every College Grad Should Have Learned in School

Best Cities for Young Professionals

How Your Grad School Selection Impacts Your Future



10 College Athletes to Watch at the Olympics

Classes begin in just a few weeks for college students. For those who are returning from a summer break, the tricky transition of balancing classes, homework, a job, and a social life begins once more.

Imagine if you had to add “catching up” to the list because you’ll be missing the first few days of class due to the Olympics. Not from watching the games or even attending, but because you’ll be competing in the international event. Many of Team USA’s athletes will be missing class this semester while they go for the gold in London. In fact, 5/8 of the US men’s Olympic gymnasts are University of Oklahoma students!

USA Today recently compiled a list of 10 college Olympians to keep your eye on during these summer games. Read the rest of this entry »



Foursquare Launches Universities 2.0 on Hundreds of College Campuses

Last year, the popular social media app foursquare announced plans to officially partner with more than 20 universities across the nation to help students explore their college campuses and learn about their school’s traditions. The program was a huge success and now than 10 million users joined in on the fun. Now foursquare is making the program even bigger and better with a new and improved version called Universities 2.0.

Universities 2.0 will have all of the fun features that the original foursquare for universities had, such as the ability to check in at various locations on campus, learn about traditions and folklore, and see what your friends thought about various things related to your campus. However, Universities 2.0 will have something that the original program did not have: badges. These badges will represent the schools on foursquare and also could be used on college campuses to advertise that the campus is a foursquare-friendly zone.

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Ron Paul’s Education Background

Ron Paul is an American doctor and politician. He is currently a Republican Congressman for the state of Texas. He was a flight surgeon in the United States Air Force during the Vietnam War, and then worked as an obstetrician and gynecologist during the 1960s and 1970s. He has been credited with being the “intellectual godfather” of the Tea Party movement and for clashing with both Republican and Democratic party leaders. EDUinReview will now take a look at Paul’s education background.

Paul was born on August 20, 1935 in Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania. His parents are Margaret and Howard Paul. He attended Dormont High School, where he was the 220-yard dash state champion during his junior year. After high school, Paul attended Gettysburg College and earned his bachelor’s degree in biology in 1957. During his undergraduate studies, he was also an active member of the Lambda Chi Alpha fraternity. Four years later, Paul earned his M.D. degree from Duke University‘s School of Medicine. In 1963, he joined the United States Air Force and served as a flight surgeon until 1965. Later that year, he joined the United States Air National Guard. After finishing his career in the military service, Paul moved to Texas with his wife in order to pursue a medical career.

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Ken Jeong’s Education Background

Ken Jeong is an American actor, comedian, and physician. Recently, he has probably become best known for his roles in several comedies, including Step Brothers, Pineapple Express, Role Models, and The Hangover. His next movie to be released in the USA will be The Hangover Part II, in which he co-stars with Bradley Cooper, Zach Galifiankis, and Ed Helms. EDUinReview will now take a look at this funny actor’s education background.

Ken was born on June 15, 1969, in Detroit, Michigan. His parents are Young and D.K. Jeong, both of whom are Korean immigrants. He grew up in Greensboro, Michigan, and attended Walter Hines Page High School. Ken was very active in high school: he was a member of the High IQ team, a violinist in the school’s orchestra, and a member of student council. He graduated from high school when he was only 16-years old. Ken then attended Duke University, where he earned his bachelor’s degree in 1990. He then attended the University of North Carolina, where he earned his medical degree in 1995. He completed his residency in New Orleans at the Ochsner Medical Center, while also beginning his stand-up comedy career.

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Kobe Bryant’s Education Background

basketball player Kobe Bean BryantKobe Bean Bryant was born August 23, 1978 in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. He is the son of Joe “Jellybean” Bryant and Pamela Cox Bryant. Joe Bryant is a former Philadelphia 76ers player and Los Angeles Sparks head coach. Bryant is the youngest of three children and his parents only son. Bryant spent much of his childhood in Italy. The family moved there for his father’s basketball career. Bryant attended high in the United States. He completed High School at Lower Merion High School in the Philadelphia Suburb of Lower Merion.

Bryant’s SAT score of 1080 would have enabled him to receive a basketball scholarship to multiple colleges. However, at the age of seventeen, Bryant went directly to the NBA. He was only the sixth player in NBA history to go directly from high school to the pros. He would have chosen Duke University had he decided to go to college first.

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NCAA Men’s Basketball Tournament Sweet 16 Preview

The Sweet 16 kicks off tonight, with a batch of four games that should all be compelling. So let’s take a look at the four games:

1. Butler vs. Wisconsin: Here we go again. A year removed from a surprising National Championship Game appearance, the Butler Bulldogs are a Cinderella story again. They upset the top-seeded Pitt Panthers in the second round (Really, who hasn’t at this point?) but will need some more help for Shelvin Mack, who probably won’t go 7-of-12 from three-point range again.

Wisconsin held off Kansas State last round and can shake their postseason demons with a solid win here. But star guard Jordan Taylor better not pull another 2-for-16 from the floor, or the Badgers will be in trouble.

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NCAA Basketball Tournament Preview

It’s time once again for The Big Dance! The 2011 NCAA Men’s Basketball Tournament seriously kicks into gear today–don’t try and sell me on play-in games–and we’re giving you a preview of the round, replete with upsets and sleepers.

Best shot for an upset/sleeper: Half the games in the Southeast bracket

The Southeast strikes me as a bracket loaded with red flags and teams that constantly underachieve, making it ripe for upsets and the chance of a low-seeded team making a run. Three seed BYU is a possibility for an early exit. Yes, Jimmer Fredette is amazing. But the suspension of Brandon Davies has turned the Cougars into a one man-show. Fredette has scored 80 of BYU’s 130 points over the last two games. He can’t do it alone.

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Most Expensive Colleges for the 2010-2011 School Year

The Most Expensive College in America: Sarah Lawrence

The Most Expensive College in America: Sarah Lawrence

College is expensive and, thus, a luxury, but despite tuition rates on the rise across America and an economic recession, many universities are still meeting and exceeding enrollment goals. Some speculate that the steady enrollment is because people chose to go back to school, or stay in school, if they can’t find a job.

But how much are you willing to invest in your future?

Since 2000, public university’s tuition rates increased, on average, at a rate of 46.5% and private non-profit schools averaged an increase of 30.8%. Read the rest of this entry »





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