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Touchdown Shutdown: Federal Furlough Threatens College Football, Financial Aid

Day two of the shutdown, haven’t slept in weeks…

Nah, just kidding. Unless you work a government job or have a loved one that does, you’re probably not feeling the pain of the furlough just yet. But come Saturday, the shutdown will rear its ugly head in the most holiest of holies: the college football field. Saturdays in the fall are a magical time; early morning purging and energy drink chugging, mid-afternoon grilling and queasiness, and late night strolls back to what you think is your dorm. Unfortunately, the white wigs want to take that majestic ritual away from certain young scholars.

Due to the budget impasse in Congress, this Saturday’s Air Force at Navy and Army at Boston College football games are being cancelled.

Empty Stadium

The reason behind the decision is fairly simple. The Air Force and Military Academies are branches of the government and use government appropriated monies to fund their athletic departments. The Naval Academy’s football games are not in jeopardy because the team is funded by non-appropriated funds, i.e. ticket sales and merchandise.

So a couple of unranked and unheralded college teams aren’t gonna take to the gridiron for the foreseeable future, big whoop, right? The government shutdown “can’t hold you,” and “we can’t stop,” or whatever you kids say. Well, until Macklemore and Miley Cyrus volunteer to help the Department of Education field calls regarding your student-loan questions, you’re gonna have a hard time dealing with next semester’s tuition. Read the rest of this entry »



Michelle Obama Visits a Secondary School in Virginia with the Cast of iCarly

tv show logoMichelle Obama is always a class-act, but she also knows how to have fun, and she showed off this funner side when she appeared with the cast of iCarly at Hayfield Secondary School in Fairfax County, Virginia. Michelle and the cast of the popular Disney show were at the school to promote a new episode of the show. Michelle will appear in this episode and thank the thousands of military families in this country for their services and sacrifices.

The pep rally also allowed Michelle to get groovy during a minute of “random dancing,” which is also a staple of the television show. Michelle’s dancing featured a few variations of some old-school dances, like “the Jerk” and “the Monkey.”

“I think she showed everybody up in the dance department,” said Jennette McCurdy, an actress on the show who plays Samantha.

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Children from Military Families Perform Better on Progress Exams

filled out test formAccording to the 2011 National Assessment of Educational Progress testing program, children who attend school on military bases do better academically than students who attend public schools. The test assess fourth and eighth graders in math and reading.

Thirty-two percent of fourth grade students who attend public schools had scores that show them as being proficient in reading. At the military schools, seven percent more (39 percent) students scored the same.

Another impressive finding showed that there is a smaller achievement gap between white and African American students in the military schools, and this gap is shrinking faster than the gaps at public schools.

So how are these military schools preparing their students so well? Is it extra test preparation?

“No,” said Leigh Anne Kapiko, the principal of Tarawa Terrace Elementary, a military school in Jacksonville, North Carolina. “That’s not done in Department of Defense schools. We don’t even have test prep materials.”

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College Students Travel with World War II Veterans to Pearl Harbor

USS Arizona Memorial, Pearl Harbor, Oahu, HawaiiSeventy years ago today, the Imperial Japanese Navy attacked the USA naval base at Pearl Harbor, Hawaii. Eight U.S. Navy battleships were damaged and four sank; many other ships were sank or destroyed. In total, 2,402 Americans were killed and 1,282 were injured.

Now, 10 students from the College of the Ozarks are getting an up close and personal look into this event as they travel to Pearl Harbor, Hawaii, Okinawa, Japan, and Hiroshima, Japan, with five World War II veterans. Two of the veterans were stationed in Pearl Harbor when the attack took place.

“It’s a tremendous opportunity to escort them to Pearl Harbor and to Japan, said Ciera Carson, one of the students who is on the trip. “I am going to document their stories and pass their stories to children I will teach some day.”

Another student, Bryan Cizek, is also excited to share this experience with the veterans.

“I am interested in history,” he said. “I want to see it through the yes of people who were there. I want to talk to the veterans and know what it was actually like, and how they dealt with things.”

Guy Piper is one of the veterans who is also going on the trip. He was on Ford Island when the attacks took  place and saw the Japanese bombed drop torpedoes on the USS Oklahoma.

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Ron Paul’s Education Background

Ron Paul is an American doctor and politician. He is currently a Republican Congressman for the state of Texas. He was a flight surgeon in the United States Air Force during the Vietnam War, and then worked as an obstetrician and gynecologist during the 1960s and 1970s. He has been credited with being the “intellectual godfather” of the Tea Party movement and for clashing with both Republican and Democratic party leaders. EDUinReview will now take a look at Paul’s education background.

Paul was born on August 20, 1935 in Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania. His parents are Margaret and Howard Paul. He attended Dormont High School, where he was the 220-yard dash state champion during his junior year. After high school, Paul attended Gettysburg College and earned his bachelor’s degree in biology in 1957. During his undergraduate studies, he was also an active member of the Lambda Chi Alpha fraternity. Four years later, Paul earned his M.D. degree from Duke University‘s School of Medicine. In 1963, he joined the United States Air Force and served as a flight surgeon until 1965. Later that year, he joined the United States Air National Guard. After finishing his career in the military service, Paul moved to Texas with his wife in order to pursue a medical career.

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Yale and Columbia Reinstate the Navy R.O.T.C. Program

For decades, there has not been any type of military presence on Yale University‘s campus. R.O.T.C programs across the country were kicked off college campuses during the Vietnam War, when students protested against the war. However, more recently, these programs have been kept off campuses at many schools due, in a large part, to the military’s “don’t ask, don’t tell” policy regarding homosexuality, which many students disapproved of. This policy was recently overturned, and now, Yale officials have signed an agreement with the Navy to reinstate a R.O.T.C program at the school, starting in the Fall 2012 semester.

The idea to reinstate a R.O.T.C program began last fall, when a student survey found that a majority of Yale students were in favor of renewing the relationship between the Navy R.O.T.C program and the school. A vote by Yale’s faculty in early May sealed the deal, allowing R.O.T.C to become a part of campus life again.

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How to Become a Navy SEAL

Our country is full of heroes. From the firefighters to the food bank volunteers, there are people, both seen and unseen, who make extraordinary differences in our lives. We give mad love to the guys and gals who slip quietly under the radar but that’s not what this particular post is about. This isn’t about the unsung heroes in our world, this is about the stuff legends are made of- stories of tragedy and triumph, determination and danger. This is about none other than the Navy SEALs.

The demise of Osama bin Laden was the finale of carefully planned efforts among military and government intelligence. Many men and women have given their time and their lives in order to fight for our country (both against bin Laden and other modern villains) but in the end, it was the Navy SEALs who delivered the swift end to a ten-year pursuit. The globe shakes with the news and with it, young men everywhere want to know how they too can become Navy SEALs.

The job description of a SEAL is outlined on the US Navy’s official website: “To become a SEAL in the Naval Special Warfare/Naval Special Operations (NSW/NSO) community, you must first go through what is widely considered to be the most physically and mentally demanding military training in existence. Then comes the tough part: the job of essentially taking on any situation or foe that the world has to offer … Conducting clandestine missions behind enemy lines. Capturing enemy targets and intelligence against impossible odds. Bringing a threatening act of sea piracy to resolution in the blink of an eye. When they say ‘The Only Easy Day Was Yesterday,’ it’s a motto backed by legendary achievements.”

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Lesbian Cadet Rejected for Readmission to West Point

Cadet Katherine Miller

Cadet Katherine Miller

A lesbian cadet resigned last year from West Point due to the “don’t ask, don’t tell” policy, a law that bans openly gay soldiers from serving in the military. Katherine Miller, 21, who ranked ninth in her class, applied again to the military school, but sadly, even after the law was repealed, was denied readmission.

“While the don’t ask, don’t tell policy was recently changed and will be repealed, the effective date has not yet been determined,” Lt. Col. Sherri Reed, the academy’s director of public affairs, said in a statement. “Due to this situation, West Point is unable to offer her readmission at this time.”

Though Miller’s admission is currently being denied, Reed said that she will be able to be readmitted, but it will take some time.

“While at the academy Ms. Miller remained in good standing and had done exceptionally well academically, militarily and physically,” she said. “The choice to seek readmission is available to her once the repeal process is completed.”

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Harvard to Allow ROTC Back on Campus

Harvard University CrestHarvard has been among many colleges that banned ROTC from their campuses in light of the military’s “don’t ask, don’t tell” policy. Today, Harvard President Drew Faust is ending the ban by signing an agreement with Navy Secretary Ray Mabus to re-introduce the program.

Earlier this year, President Obama urged colleges to open their doors to military recruiters during his State of the Union address. “It is time to leave behind the divisive battles of the past. It is time to move forward as one nation,” he said.

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Military Faces Too Fat to Fight Young Recruits

young recruitThe effects of America’s expanding waistlines are spreading to all corners and facets of the country, including the military. In trying to attract new young recruits, the military is challenged by teenagers who are too overweight to be enlisted.

According to USA Today, Mission:Readiness, a non-profit group of retired military personnel, says that about 75 percent of today’s young adults wouldn’t be able to join the military if they wanted to because they are either too heavy, didn’t graduate from high school, have criminal records or have other health problems.

In an effort to maintain the nation’s security, Mission:Readiness is calling on schools to ramp up the nutrition of their school lunch programs now so that risk to the nation’s level of preparedness can be prevented down the road.

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