yale university

yale university

The Oldest Universities in the U.S.

We have a list of the oldest universities and colleges in the United States. Some of them are ranked very high overall in the world, as well as being members of the honored Ivy League. They all have very rich heritage and notable alumni. However, the oldest college in the United States is Harvard University founded in 1636 and chartered in 1650. Now lets take a look at the other oldest colleges and universities in the United States.

The oldest universities in the US are:

Harvard University – 1636 (chartered in 1650)

Located in Massachusetts, it was called New College at first before being renamed to Harvard. It was named after John Harvard, who gave money to the school. It is one of the world’s prestige college universities and a top Ivy league school.

College of William and Mary – 1693

It was named after the British Monarchs who were over the city. Once the school of famous president, Thomas Jefferson, this school is the oldest in the South.

Yale University – 1701

Ranked 15th in the world and was founded as “College School” but renamed to Yale because of a gift received from Elihu Yale. It was the first school to award a PhD. Yale is located in New Haven, Connecticut.

Princeton University – 1746

It was called College of New Jersey at first before being renamed to Princeton 10 years later. It is currently ranked as a top 10 school in the world overall.

Columbia University – 1754

Located in New York City, Columbia was chartered in 1754 and originally called King’s College before being renamed in 1784. It is known for the famous Pulitzer Prize and is ranked 16th in the world overall.

Older universities are more prestigious and a degree from these schools is instantly recognized as something to be proud of. Did you go to one of these older Ivy league schools? Post your comment below! Also, we have a list of the largest universities in USA.

Search more about these colleges at our college finder.

This story was originally published in November 2009. It has been updated August 2018.



Forbes Announces Top Colleges: Does Your Pick Make the List?

I still remember being a restless high school senior waiting to cut my ties and finally make it to college. My sister had chosen a community college for her freshman-sophomore experience just three years before me, and since I followed in her footsteps in most areas I naturally considered taking the same route.

So on a hot day in mid-May back in 2004, my mom and I made the journey just one hour south of Wichita, Kansas, to check out the college that would soon be my new home. While my stay there was short – just two years until I could snag my associates degree – it was memorable. And the following two years spent at Wichita State University securing my bachelor’s degree were even more enjoyable than the first.

When I was looking for schools, my top priorities were proximity, price and degree offerings, among other minor considerations. Out-of-state universities weren’t an option for me as tuition would’ve been outrageous. And along the consideration of price, I also wanted a school that could offer me a scholarship.

Earlier this month, Forbes announced its list of top 650 colleges in America. Among its highest-ranking universities were Princeton, Williams College and Stanford, with Johnson & Wales and Texas Southern University snagging the last spots in 649th and 650th place.

While some have criticized the methods Forbes and other news sources, including US News and Newsweek, use to determine their respective rankings, there’s really no one, tried and true way to determine which colleges are superior. Because the truth is, everyone has their own opinion about what makes one college better than another. Read the rest of this entry »



Yale Offers Class on New York’s Nightlife

Blue and white yale logoMake room for another unusual college course. One of students’ favorite pastimes has been transformed into a class at one of America’s oldest universities. Yale University is educating students in the art of painting the town red.

The class, ‘Dance Music and Nightlife Culture in New York City,’ seeks to answer the burning question: “Why do we go out at night?”

Class excursions include trips to New York’s hottest clubs and guest speakers like well-known DJ Simonez Wolf and Vibe magazine co-founder Scott Poulson-Bryant.

Teacher Madison Moore, who is also a doctoral student, assures students that this class isn’t just about getting drunk and partying.

Students will listen to lectures like ‘Studio 54 and Limelight: The Birth of the Mega Club.’ Also, students will read texts from Village Voice writer Michael Musto and 1988 winner of the Ironman Nightlife Decathlon, Anthony Haden-Guest.

“It’s about the history of it, the Harlem cabarets, understanding race, gender, sex, Prohibition and the law,” Moore said.

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Yale Quarterback Chooses Football Over Scholarship

Rhodes ScholarshipBy Cabrone D. Brewer

In a dramatic display of the importance of what is simply referred to as “The Game,” Yale Senior quarterback Patrick Witt has decided to withdraw his Rhodes Scholarship application in order to participate in the upcoming Harvard vs. Yale matchup this Saturday.

Despite being a finalist for the prestigious international post-graduate award for study at the University of Oxford, Witt informed the Rhodes committee that he would not be able to attend the scholarship interview on November 19 because of a conflict with the 128th installment of one of the greatest rivalries in college football history.

“I will be playing in the Yale-Harvard game this Saturday. I have withdrawn my application for the Rhodes Scholarship. My focus this week is solely on preparing for the Game alongside my teammates and coaches,’’ Witt said in a public statement released by Yale.

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Top 10 Colleges and Universities from U.S. for 2012 News

U.S. News College Rankings IconEach year, U.S. News releases rankings of the top universities around the country. Although many education experts question the value of college rankings, most schools use these rankings a marketing tool. The list of best colleges is almost unvaryingly topped with Ivy League institutions, followed by highly competitive technical universities, such as MIT and CalTech. The rankings are determined by a number of criteria, including student matriculation rate, class size and the average ACT/SAT score of the student body.

This year, California Institute of Technology and Massachusetts Institute of Technology both rose from the 2011 rankings, in an odd tie between five universities for the fifth position.

Here are the top 10 Colleges, according to U.S. News:

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Esteem Program Helps Students Stay Religious During College

For many college students, it can be very difficult to maintain their faith. However, Marysa Leya, a recent Yale University graduate, challenged this typical view that college students will stray from their religious practices until they finish college and hopefully return to their religion. When Marysa graduated from high school, her biology teacher gave her a hand-painted crucifix for her dorm room. On the back, he wrote her a message that said: “Be sure to stay as grounded and awesome as you are now.” Her grandmother also encouraged to not “lose [her] faith out there on that liberal East Coast.”

During her four years of college, Marysa attended every single Sunday Mass and also discussed scripture on a weekly basis. She was also very active in secular activities on campus, such as drawing cartoons for the school’s newspaper, captaining the tennis team, and earning a 3.78 GPA.

“I can’t imagine shirking my faith,” Marysa said. “But how do you keep it important around all the chaos of med school? How do I become a meaningful member of a new parish? How do I allow the kind of experiences I’ve had here to continue?”

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Yale Fraternity is Suspended for Sexist Chants

In October 2010, the Delta Kappa Epsilon fraternity at Yale University marched their pledges through campus, chanting explicit phrases such as “No Means Yes” and phrases about various sexual acts, including necrophilia. Many of these chants were very discriminatory and demoralizing towards women. The fraternity was chastised for the event and chapter leaders apologized. Then, the fraternity’s national office demanded that the chapter not continue with any pledge activities for the rest of the year.

The members of Delta Kappa Epsilon (DKE) probably thought this was the end of their punishment, but in May 2011, USA Today reported that Yale University had decided to ban the fraternity from recruiting new members or holding any activities on the school’s campus for five years. This will be quite a change for the school’s Greek life because DKE has been an active fraternity at Yale since it was founded there in 1855.

Yale officials claim that disciplining DKE by forbidding them from recruiting and holding activities on campus in order to protect “an educational environment free from harassment and intimidation.”

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Yale Fraternity Suspended for Sexual Harassment

“Hazing” is a word commonly associated with college fraternities. Fraternities have traditionally used embarrassing methods to harass and humiliate freshmen fraternity pledges in order to initiate new membership. In recent years awareness has been raised on this practice and sanctioned have been implemented by colleges to dismantle harassing techniques. Despite university efforts the practices continue. The Delta Kappa Epsilon fraternity at Yale University has recently come under fire for inappropriate behavior related to hazing pledges. However, instead of harassing their own members this fraternity is being punished for the harassment of other students on campus.

The incidents in question took place in October 2010 on Yale campus. DKE members are reported to have yelled obscene chants at female students; such as “no means yes, yes means anal”. Members were also seen holding signs on campus reading “we love Yale sluts” and rating freshmen woman on attractiveness.

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Lesbian Cadet Rejected for Readmission to West Point

Cadet Katherine Miller

Cadet Katherine Miller

A lesbian cadet resigned last year from West Point due to the “don’t ask, don’t tell” policy, a law that bans openly gay soldiers from serving in the military. Katherine Miller, 21, who ranked ninth in her class, applied again to the military school, but sadly, even after the law was repealed, was denied readmission.

“While the don’t ask, don’t tell policy was recently changed and will be repealed, the effective date has not yet been determined,” Lt. Col. Sherri Reed, the academy’s director of public affairs, said in a statement. “Due to this situation, West Point is unable to offer her readmission at this time.”

Though Miller’s admission is currently being denied, Reed said that she will be able to be readmitted, but it will take some time.

“While at the academy Ms. Miller remained in good standing and had done exceptionally well academically, militarily and physically,” she said. “The choice to seek readmission is available to her once the repeal process is completed.”

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Universities Gain More Endowments After 2009 Losses

In 2009, the recession put a heavy strain on university endowments, but things seem to be turning around, according to the comprehensive Nacubo-Commonfund Study of Endowments, released last Wednesday.

The value of endowments increased an average of 11.9 percent for the fiscal year of 2010, which ended in June, nearly making up for 2009’s losses. They decreased an average of 18.7 percent in the last fiscal year. The gains follow a 14.4 percent increase of the S&P 500, a commonly-used stock performance benchmark.

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