University of Pennsylvania

University of Pennsylvania

Here are the Top 10 Universities, According to U.S. News

Love ’em or hate ’em the annual U.S. Rankings of the country’s universities have been revealed. Though many accuse the rankings of being an outdated system where the same schools always rise to the top, they can be an interesting way to compare some of the many institutions of higher education in the country.

princeton

Though you really can’t narrow the college experience down to a few measurable data points, the people behind the U.S. News rankings try their best to determine what combination of factors creates the nation’s top schools. Factors considered include student retention, faculty resources, student selectivity, financial resources, alumni giving, and graduation rates.

Based on those factors and more, here are the top 10 American universities for 2015.

10. California Institute of Technology
Tuition and fees (2014-2015): $43,362
Enrollment: 977
The student-to-faculty ratio at the California Institute of Technology is 3:1. Its students are actively involved in research projects with NASA, the National Science Foundation and the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services.

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Socioeconomic Standing Impacts Students’ Abilities to Ask for Help in Classrooms

1st or 2nd grade student with his hand raisedFor a long time, we have thought that students from different socioeconomic backgrounds have different levels of success due to the resources available to them in their schools and from their families. However, a new study from the University of Pennsylvania shows an equally important factor in a child’s success is how the study identifies and secures resources for himself.

The study found that the children who came from middle class families are more comfortable and assertive when asking their teachers for help than are the children who come from working class families. Because the students ask more often and more assertively, they often get more attention and assistance from their teachers, which in turn helps them do better in class.

The students who come from middle-class families often directly address the teachers in class and sometimes will even interrupt the teacher in order to make their questions known. The students who came from working-class families were more likely to wait for assistance and rarely sought it out themselves. If they did actually seek out assistance from the teacher, they were passive and waited longer for the teacher to notice them than the students from middle-class families did, on average.

According to Jessica McCrory Calarco, the author of the study, the children who are more comfortable asking for assistance might have learned to do so from their parents. These parents “also deliberately coach children on the language and strategies to use in making these requests [for additional help from the teachers].”

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Jon Huntsman Jr’s Education Background

Jon Huntsman Jr on black backgroundJon Huntsman Jr. is an American diplomat, politician, and former governor of Utah. He is currently receiving attention for being a candidate for the 2012 Republican presidential nomination. He has also served as the CEO of the Huntsman Corporation, which is a family-owned company. EDUinReview will now take a look at Huntsman’s education background.

Huntsman was born on March 26, 1960 in Palo Alto, California. His parents are Karen and Jon Huntsman, Sr. The couple have eight other children. Huntsman is also a third cousin of another presidential hopeful, Mitt Romney. When Huntsman was fifteen-years old, he earned the highest rank in the Boy Scouts of America, the Eagle Scout. Huntsman dropped out of high school in order to pursue a musical career with the band, Wizard. He later earned a G.E.D. and enrolled at the University of Utah, where he joined the Sigma Chi fraternity. Huntsman took two years off from his education to serve as a Mormon missionary in Taiwan. After serving in Taiwan, he returned to the USA and earned his bachelor’s degree from the University of Pennsylvania in international politics.

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College Presidents with Million-Dollar Salaries

Thirty college presidents earned over $1 million in the 2008 fiscal year, according to a salary report by The Chronicle of Higher Education.  That’s quite a jump from the previous year’s 23.

On the other hand, 78 percent of college chiefs’ salaries were under $600,000 in 2008 and roughly half of them received less than $400,000. In 2007, 82 percent of the presidents’ compensation packages were under $600,000, and 58 percent received less than $400,000.

“As usual, there are a few outliers,” Jeffrey Selingo said, editor of The Chronicle. “When looking at the very big numbers, there’s always a lot of reasons why those people got such high compensation packages.”

With kickbacks of more than $50 million, Selingo gathered salary data from the tax filings of 448 private colleges. The Chronicle’s survey comes at a time of increased tuition rates amid an economic crisis, and it’s likely that this report will spark debates on whether or not college presidents are paid too much.

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Students Lend Support to Haiti Earthquake

haiti earthquakePeople all across the globe are reaching out to the millions of Haitians who were struck by the most devastating earthquake to hit the small island in more than 200 years.

And as word of the disaster spread rapidly around the country, students from college campuses quickly organized and lent their support to the victims in a show of force and solidarity in a manner that is solely unique to the unbridled passion and altruism of college students.

Here are just a few examples of the outpouring support that students are coordinating from campuses across the country.

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Top Five Public Universities for Ivy League Alternatives

ivy-leagueJust like Blair on Gossip Girl has dreamed of going to Yale since childhood, many students simply won’t be happy unless they are accepted to an Ivy League school. Some are driven since birth to maintain a perfect educational reputation, and some will do whatever it takes to attend the school of their dreams. In the end, is it worth the extreme hard work and dedication? After all, what’s in a name, as long as you get a top education and don’t owe more than what your parent’s house is worth when it is all said and done.

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Finding Love on a College Campus

High school seniors graduate, and the summer ends. Prospective freshmen must now say their tearful goodbyes and head off to the unknown world of college, wondering what their future will hold for them. What classes will I enjoy? What will I choose for a major? But more importantly – will I find my true love here? According to that infamous British comedy, love, actually, is all around. It’s in your Intro to Finance class, and in the local dive bar off-campus. It’s at football games and in coffee shops. Love is an intangible feeling that we’re all born with, whether we like it or not.

College students find love on campus (photo via Andrew Flavin)

College students find love on campus (photo via Andrew Flavin)

On her first day at the University of Pennsylvania, Elizabeth Banks met Max Handelman. Ten years later, Handelman proposed unexpectedly. “He said that after 10 years, he owed it to me to completely surprise me,” Elizabeth Banks said. The couple sealed the deal by reading letters from their first year of dating in college in lieu of vows. Read the rest of this entry »





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