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40 Percent of Students Majoring in STEM Subjects Change Majors

blue printsIn an effort to encourage students to enjoy science, President Obama held the first White House Science Fair last fall in the State Dining Room. During this event, he tested and played with various projects that students had made. This was just one way that President Obama has been trying to increase the USA’s international competitiveness in the STEM (science, technology, engineering, and math) industries.

For years, politicians and educators have been trying to think of ways to increase the level of interest that their students have in science. This is even more important today than it has been in the past, as Americans are competing with people from other countries for jobs in the international marketplace.

Sadly, it seems like most Americans are still losing interest in this fields shortly after their days of science fairs end. Why? According to David E. Goldberg, an emeritus engineering professor, it is because when they get to college, they face “the math-science death march.”

Recent studies show that 40 percent of college students who plan to pursue a major in the engineering or science fields change their majors or do not earn a degree at all. If you include pre-med students in this figure, the percentage jumps up to 60 percent. This is twice as much as the attrition rate of all other majors combined.

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Students Are Choosing to Live in Fancier Housing

I lived in the dorms during my freshman year at the University of Oklahoma. I shared a tiny little room with another girl and a bathroom with three other girls. The situation was cozy, to say the least.

Then, during my sophomore year, I moved out of the dorms and into the fantastic world that was a college apartment. Most of the apartments in my town were designed for students and included separate leases (so you didn’t have to worry about if your deadbeat roommate will pay rent on time,) a community tanning bed, a private gym, high-speed Internet, and more cable channels than I knew what to do with. My parents thought this was a little extravagant, but as I told them time and time again, this was the new standard of college living.

Evidently, I was right. Apartment complexes across the nation are catering to us college kids who want to live in the lap of luxury.

“It’s a national trend,” said Dan Rosenfeld, who develops apartments that are college-kid-friendly. “There is competition among schools, and [the apartments near campus] have to provide a competitively attractive student environment.”

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Top 10 Colleges with the Best Health Care Services

Nobody likes to get sick during the school year. I mean, you do get a few days off from classes, but after you recover, you have a mountain of homework and readings to catch up on, you have to find those in-class lecture notes from a fellow classmate, and you probably don’t feel completely up to par for a few days after you return to classes.

So, whenever I get sick during the school year, I rush myself to my school’s health services center to try to get myself some medication ASAP. Although the health center on campus is decent, it’s never been something to write home to my parents about. I guess I should have paid attention to the Princeton Review’s list of the Top 10 Colleges with the Best Health Care Services.

Other students have bigger issues, however. Chronic diseases, mental health concerns and sexual education and services are all things your college’s health center should be able to help you with, but not all schools are created equal. Choosing a school that is best suited to help your personal health needs is imperative for every student to consider.

Without any further adu, here are the top 10 schools you should go to if you are notorious for getting sick – or if your parents just want to have fantastic health care services available on your school’s campus.

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UCLA Student Joins Libyan Rebels for Summer Vacation

For months now, the Libya rebel fighters have been fighting for their freedom from under Muammar Qaddafi’s reign. Thousands of people have died and it is more than likely that many more will lose their lives before the revolution is complete. However, these scary facts did not deter Chris Jeon, a 21-year old UCLA student, from journeying to the country in order to join in on the action.

“This is one of the few real revolutions,” Jeon said. “I just thought I’d come check it out.”

Jeon is a math major at UCLA. After talking with his friends, Jeon decided that it would be a “‘sick’ vacation…to come here and fight with the rebels.” So he bought a one-way plane ticket from Los Angeles to Cairo, Egypt. Once in Egypt, he traveled to Libya, where he has been living for almost two weeks now. He does not speak Arabic but has been using sign language and Italian to communicate with the fighters and their families. His parents do not know that he is currently in Libya.

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Gore Verbinski’s Education Background

Director Gore VerbinskiGregor “Gore” Verbinski was born on March 16, 1964 in Oak Ridge, Tennessee. He is the son of Vic and Laurette Verbinski. His father  worked as a nuclear physicist at Oak Ridge National Laboratory. Verbinski is the third of five children. His siblings are Janine, Claire, Diane and Steven.

In 1967 the Verbinski family moved to Southern California, where Verbinski grew up in the town of La Jolla. Verbinski attended Torrey Pines Elementary, Muirlands Junior High, and La Jolla High School. He went on to attend UCLA Film School. Verbinski graduated with his BFA in Film from UCLA in 1987.

Early in his career, Verbinski was active in several rock band in the Los Angeles area. His directing career began when he started directing music videos for bands like Bad Religion, NOFX, 24-7 Spyz and Monster Magnet. Verbinski was working at Palomar Pictures at this time.

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Foursquare Launches Universities 2.0 on Hundreds of College Campuses

Last year, the popular social media app foursquare announced plans to officially partner with more than 20 universities across the nation to help students explore their college campuses and learn about their school’s traditions. The program was a huge success and now than 10 million users joined in on the fun. Now foursquare is making the program even bigger and better with a new and improved version called Universities 2.0.

Universities 2.0 will have all of the fun features that the original foursquare for universities had, such as the ability to check in at various locations on campus, learn about traditions and folklore, and see what your friends thought about various things related to your campus. However, Universities 2.0 will have something that the original program did not have: badges. These badges will represent the schools on foursquare and also could be used on college campuses to advertise that the campus is a foursquare-friendly zone.

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Mila Kunis’ Education Background

Mila Kunis is an American actress who first gained acclaim for her portrayal of Jackie Burkhart on the comedy series, That ’70s Show. Continuing her role as a comedic actress, Kunis then voiced the character Meg in Family Guy and portrayed Rachel Jansen in Forgetting Sarah Marshall. Then, in 2010, she co-starred with Natalie Portman in Black Swan, for which she won the Marcello Mastroianni Award for Best Young Actress and was nominated for a Golden Globe Award for Best Supporting Actress. Her next film to hit the big screen will be Friends with Benefits, in which she co-stars with Justin Timberlake. EDUinReview will now take a look at her education background

Kunis was born on August 14, 1983, in Chernivtsi, Ukranian SSR. Her parents are Elvira and Mark Kunis and she has one older brother, Mark. When she was seven years old, her family moved to Los Angeles, CA, where she enrolled in Rosewood Elementary School. She then attended Hubert Howe Bancroft Middle School. For high school, she was tutored by an on-set tutor while she was filming That ’70s Show. When the show was not in production, Kunis attended Fairfax High School. After high school, Kunis attended both UCLA and Loyola Marymount University for short periods of time but has since put her education on hold in order to pursue her acting career.

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Jack Black’s Education Background

Jack Black is an American actor, comedian, and musician who is possibly best known for being part of the band Tenacious D and his slap stick comedies. His most recent movie to hit the big screens was Kung Fu Panda 2 and he has several other movies that are scheduled to be released in 2011. EDUinReview will now take a look at this funny man’s education background.

Black as born on August 28, 1969, in Santa Monica, California. His parents are Judith and Thomas Black, both of whom are satellite engineers. When Black was 10-years old, his parents divorced and Black moved to Culver City, California with his father. Black attended Poseidon School, a private school designed for students who were struggling in the traditional school system. He also attended Crossroads School, where he discover his love of acting and excelled in the school’s drama department. Black attended UCLA for two years but then dropped out in order to pursue a career in the entertainment industry.

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UCLA Student Apologizes for Racist YouTube Rant

UCLA Racist YouTube RantAlexandra Wallace, the University of California, Los Angeles student who created the viral “Asians in the Library” YouTube video apologized for rant. UCLA’s campus paper, The Daily Bruin, reports that Wallace regrets creating the video, in which she imitates speaking an Asian language with nonsense words after accusing Asian parents of not teaching their children to “fend for themselves” or manners. She also goes on to complain about “hordes” of Asian students talking on their cell phones in the library.

“Clearly the original video posted by me was inappropriate,” said Wallace. “I cannot explain what possessed me to approach the subject as I did, and if I could undo it, I would. I’d like to offer my apology to the entire UCLA campus. For those who cannot find it within them to accept my apology, I understand.”

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More Mental Health Problems in College Freshmen

College freshman are experiencing more mental health problems than ever, according to a study conducted at UCLA‘s Higher Education Research Institute.

“More students are arriving on campus with problems, needing support, and today’s economic factors are putting a lot of extra stress on college students, as they look at their loans and wonder if there will be a career waiting for them on the other side.” said Brian Van Brunt, director of counseling at Western Kentucky University and president of the American College Counseling Association.

“The American Freshman: National Norms Fall 2010” surveyed over 200,000  full-time freshman students at four-year colleges and found that a significant percentage of students rated their mental  health as “below average.” Additionally, merely 52 percent of  students said their emotional health was above average. In 1985, it was 64 percent.

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