u.s. department of education

u.s. department of education

FAFSA Error Affects Thousands of Students’ Financial Aid

If your financial aid package for the upcoming school year seems off, you may want to have it checked. An error on the online Free Application for Federal Student Aid, better known as FAFSA, made some applicants appear far better off financially than they actually are.

financial aid

The error on the online form causes some low-income filers appear to be millionaires, which can have a dramatic impact on what, if any, federal financial aid they can receive.

Jeff Baker, policy liaison at the Education Department’s Office of Federal Student Aid told student-aid administrators at the Chronicle of Higher Education that the error has already impacted thousands of borrowers, and is likely to impact even more.

“It’s a serious problem,” Baker said at the National Association of Student Financial Aid Administrators’ annual meeting. “We have to fix it.”

Read the rest of this entry »



For-Profit Colleges Under Fire

Earlier this year, President Obama and his administration made waves when they announced new steps to address concerns about student loan debt. They announced new regulations that would require career colleges to do a better job of preparing students for gainful employment. If the schools do not meet the new regulations, they could lose access to federal student aid.

books and money

In a release about the new regulations, U.S. Education Secretary Arne Duncan said, “Higher education should open up doors of opportunity, but students in these low-performing programs often end up worse off than before they enrolled: saddled by debt and with few – if any – options for a career.”

“The proposed regulations address growing concerns about unaffordable levels of loan debt for students enrolled in these programs by targeting the lowest-performing programs, while shining a light on best practices and giving all programs an opportunity to improve.”

Read the rest of this entry »



Government Sues for Student Loan Repayment

Rising college tuition costs force an abundance of students to rely on Federal student loans. When it comes to repaying those loans, American borrowers are defaulting at an increasing rate. The United States Department of Education is taking action to get their money by suing persons who owe large loan repayments to the government.

“Defaulting” on a loan occurs when a borrower fails to make payments as determined by the loan agreement. This is different from “deferring” a loan; an option used by many students to postpone the repaying of a loan. It is not uncommon for student loans to come with a deferment option for a certain period of time. When deferment time is up and the borrower does not pay, the loan becomes “delinquent”. After a period of delinquency, the loan goes into “default”. When a loan defaults the lender has legal power to obtain their money. In the case of federal student loans the lender is the United States Government.

Read the rest of this entry »



Department of Education to Fine Virginia Tech

Virginia Tech shooting aftermath via time.com

The United States Department of Education intends to fine Virginia Tech $55,000 for violations related to federal campus-crime reporting law regarding the tragic shootings that took place on April 16, 2007. The Department of Education accused Virginia Tech of not issuing “timely warnings”, a violation of the Clery Act, during the violence taking place on campus, and plans to issue the maximum fine of $27,500 for each violation.

April 16th, 2007, Virginia Tech senior Seung-Hui Cho went on a shooting rampage on Virginia Tech’s campus. At 7:15am, Cho fatally shot two students in a residence hall. He then entered an academic building and began shooting at students and faculty members. Before the ordeal was over, Cho killed 33 people before taking his own life.

Read the rest of this entry »



For-Profit Schools Sue the U.S. Secretary of Education

For-profit colleges have been taking a lot of criticism lately for their questionable marketing practices and deceptive methods to get students to qualify for financial aid. Now these schools are fighting back and have launched a lawsuit against the U.S. Department of Education.

The Association of Private-Sector Colleges and Universities has filed this lawsuit to undo the new regulations that are set to take place on July 1 citing them as unconstitutional. The rules have been put in place to stop recruiters from being paid based on the number of students they enroll, and to eliminate deceptive advertising by schools. The new regulations are part of a large package designed to stop schools from producing students that are poorly educated and in a large amount of student debt.

Read the rest of this entry »



Mom Sent Son to School With Gun to Ward Off Bullies

bullyTeen suicides in response to humiliating bullying from their peers have been headlining many local news reports, causing parents great concern for their children’s safety at school. The topic of bullying has received so much media attention that many celebrities, and even President Obama, have taped video messages encouraging teenagers across America to be brave and rise above the taunting.

But Connecticut 38 year-old mother Sylvia Mojica’s fear for her son’s life may have put her in the slammer. Mojica reportedly sent her 12 year-old son to school with a knife and a BB gun to apparently ward off school bullies.

The Hartford police have charged her with risking injury to a minor and she is presumed to be in court on Friday, October 29, 2010. Read the rest of this entry »



More Students are Attending Classes Online

computerWhat does the typical high school classroom look like to you? It maybe has some desks, some students, and a teacher, right? At least, that’s  how the typical classroom looked a few decades ago.

According to the Sloan Consortium, more than one million students attended classes via the Internet in 2008. Of those million, around 200,000 were enrolled in full-time virtual schools, meaning they attend all of their classes online.

“If students have their own computer, it can travel with them from home to school,” Karen Cator, director of the office of education technology at the U.S. Department of Education. “There can be software programs that help the student, or there can be an online teacher, but the technology can also augment a teacher in a face-to-face classroom.” Read the rest of this entry »



Race to the Top Awards $3.4 Billion in Grants

race-to-the-topAll of America has been anxiously awaiting the U.S. Education Department’s announcement regarding the winners of the second and final round of the Race to the Top competition.

Thirty-five states and Washington D.C. all submitted applications that were then narrowed down to 19 finalists a couple of months ago.

CNN.com released the news via twitter that the District of Columbia, Florida, Georgia, Hawaii, Maryland, Massachusetts, New York, North Carolina, Ohio and Rhode Island are the lucky recipients of the contest prize. Read the rest of this entry »



Promise Neighborhoods Bring Change to Families in Inner-Cities

harlem children's zone logoSometimes it is hard to break out of a cycle, especially when the cycle is one your family or you have been living for years. But a non-profit organization called the Harlem Children’s Zone does just that for children and families who live in one of the most impoverished cities in the country.

The Harlem Children’s Zone’s mission is breaking the cycle of generational poverty for the thousands of children and families it serves by focusing on urban education. The organization was established in the 1970s and has helped tens of thousands of people since it was founded. Read the rest of this entry »



Gender Gap and the “Boy Crisis” in Higher Education

Is there a “boy crisis” in higher education in the United States? Are females outperforming males at disturbingly high rates?

Yes and no. It depends on how you look at it.

The numbers do seem to indicate that something is going on. According to the U.S. Department of Education, significantly more college degrees are being awarded to women than men. Women earn about 62% of all associate’s degrees, 57% of bachelor’s degrees, and 59% of master’s degrees. This is especially interesting because, on the undergraduate level, there isn’t much of a gap at all between males and females entering college. The problem is with male graduation rates.

However, some argue that the so-called “boy crisis” is overstated. A recent report by the American Association of University Women (AAUW) argues that the most significant disparity in educational achievement isn’t gender—it’s socioeconomic status and income level, which makes a far greater impact than gender. The gender gap in education is quite high among poorer students, but among students of middle class or higher status, the gender gap in favor of women is only slight.

Another important part of the educational gap to consider is the question of marketable skills and majors. Traditionally, majors that have attracted women (education, nursing, liberal arts) have led to lower paying careers, while majors that have traditionally attracted men (sciences, computers, engineering, business) have led to higher paying careers. As more women take on nontraditional majors, and as these fields open up more to women, this gap is closing. However, this disparity certainly hasn’t gone away—and it’s just as important as the question of whether more women than men are graduating from college.

Furthermore, it’s important to look at the entire socioeconomic picture for women after college. Women still only make about 76 cents for every dollar that a man makes. The degree to which this gap has closed over the years (it was closer to 50 cents after World War II) is certainly something to applaud—but there’s still a serious gap. Moreover, the gap between male and female wages increases quite a bit as women get older and into the years where people typically accumulate wealth. Right out of college, the gap isn’t all that high, but after the childbearing years are over, women tend to make significantly less than men. Women who choose to have children commonly find themselves downwardly mobile in the workplace, and the same is not true for men who have children—a fact that is not being offset much at all by women’s increased graduation rates.

So should we be concerned by the gap between male and female educational achievement? Of course. But the situation is more complicated than it looks on the surface. For a more accurate understanding of gender inequality in education and beyond, it’s important to look at the bigger picture.





About

We help students find reviews on colleges, get help with student loan refinancing and other resourceful content to help students.

Social Links

© 2018 EDUInReview.com